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On my computer I have a dual-boot of Windows 7 and Ubuntu 12.10. Ubuntu was just installed from a USB flash drive.

After the installation finishes, my computer boots straight to Windows without any indication that either GRUB or Ubuntu is even installed. If I boot from the USB drive again, the install screen shows up as if I didn't install it.

I've tried boot-repair and got: link to paste.ubuntu.com

And this is what I tried to repair:

sudo chroot "/mnt/boot-sav/sda7" dpkg --configure -a

sudo chroot "/mnt/boot-sav/sda7" apt-get install -fy

sudo chroot "/mnt/boot-sav/sda7" apt-get purge -y --force-yes grub*-common shim* linux-signed*
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See askubuntu.com/questions/88384/… –  user68186 Dec 23 '12 at 22:14
    
Have you tried reinstalling GRUB from a live version of Ubuntu? –  kelvinafox Dec 23 '12 at 22:42

2 Answers 2

I have successfully achieved dual boot from installation on the primary hard drive with the following configuration and issues:

Hardware; August 2012 build HP Envy DV7 laptop, Windows 8, i5 Ivy Bridge, UEFI/Secure Boot. Linux: Ubuntu 12.10 x64 ISO.

In UEFI (F10 menu):

• •Disable Secure Boot. I could not achieve boot in any configuration with it on. • •UEFI boot scheme (not Legacy BIOS). I tried Legacy mode, and can boot from disk, but not from an installation on the hard drive. UEFI flies right by it during boot every way I tried with it on. In Ubuntu:

• •/Boot=EFI, /=EXT4, /Home=EXT4, SWAP=swap With this configuration I can boot with user intervention during the boot sequence: 1) Select F9 Boot options in UEFI (BIOS) 2) Select the now avialble Ubuntu 12.10 option and procede. 3) Immediately the Ubuntu boot option screen is now available. Select prefered option and procede. 4) I'm in.

If anyone following this thread comes up with a way for the Windows UEFI boot loader to recognize the /Boot partition manually, please share. The above method is not that much of a pain, but an automatic boot whence windows recognizes Ubuntu as a boot option would be a somewhat more elegant affair. Also, I would prefer to have Windows handle the primary boot sequence, and not grub, as a personal preference, so I can live with the above until other options are available.

Gregg

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Welcome to Ask Ubuntu! This seems like it is, at least in part, an answer to the question, but it's worded as though you're asking a separate, related question. To make this clearer for people searching for help (so they know this post might help them), and to decrease the likelihood that this post will be considered not-an-answer and deleted, I recommend rewording this, and also removing anything that is actually a question (rather than a proposed solution) and posting it as a new question. –  Eliah Kagan Dec 24 '12 at 14:51
    
Also, please avoid posting the same answer in more than one place. When tempted to do so, this means that either: (1) the answer should be customized to account for what is different about the different questions, or (2) one question should be flagged for closure as a duplicate of another question. (You can flag posts once you gain 15 reputation on the site.) –  Eliah Kagan Dec 24 '12 at 14:52

seems that you are having problem with GRUB LOADER. Normally when window in installed on a machine running ubuntu, GRUB is replaced by native window's MBR. This is what happens when you are expecting a GRUB loader to come up and you are surprisingly greeted with nothing but windows booting up. Here is what I did to repair my GRUB loader.

To repair GRUB, you can use any live cd to boot into ubuntu and open up terminal and then issue the command sudo grub-install . Well, in many cases, that fails. For that, you have to manually mount the root partition and then re-install the GRUB into it. It follows as:

sudo fdisk -l 
...list of devices and partions
//here find out the root partition (mine is sda3, so i am condireing /dev/sda3 here)

sudo mkdir /mnt/anyname
sudo mount /dev/sda3 /mnt/anyname
cd /mnt/anyname
sudo grub-install --root-directory=/mnt/anyname /dev/sda

This will re-install your GRUB. If you are encountering any problem in installing the GRUB, just go to google, there are millions of guides on "installing the grub in linux".

Merry Christmas :)

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