Take the 2-minute tour ×
Ask Ubuntu is a question and answer site for Ubuntu users and developers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I use at work Ubuntu Desktop 12.04. 80% of the time I spend in the terminal. After switching from the putty on gnome terminal, I was unpleasantly surprised to work with some devices (eg Extereme Summit X650):

gnome terminal:

# Module lldp configuration.
Press <SPACE> to continue or <Q> to quit:

after press SPACE:

# Module lldp configuration.
Press <SPACE> to continue or <Q> to quit:[60;D#

#
# Module msdp configuration.
#

putty(Windows and Linux)/konsole

# Module lldp configuration.
Press <SPACE> to continue or <Q> to quit:

after press SPACE:

# Module lldp configuration.
#

#
# Module msdp configuration.
#

How to fix the gnome terminal?

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried typing the command reset in Terminal? –  King Shimkus Aug 1 at 13:10
    
I tried Terminal in many Gnome based distributions - the result is similar. –  Allan Sundry Aug 1 at 17:14

1 Answer 1

It took awhile to understand your question.

This quote of Bill Hedberg from comp.terminals helped me.

The WY60 is an "ASCII terminal", which means that it responds to "ASCII" control sequences of the form "Esc~;" The VT100 is an "ANSI terminal", which means it responds to ANSI control sequences of the form "Esc[0m"

From your results the [60;D# is the code used to clear the current line that is not being understood. Though ~ is ascii 126 and [ is ascii 91 I don't see exactly how it applies yet. It may matter somehow in octal or hex.

I think the problem is related to WY60 vs. VT100 emulation software involved on both sides. In each case check what is set in your $TERM variable and associated entries in /etc/{termcap|terminfo}. Once you find the cause of the problem a solution like wy60 might apply.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VT100

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dell_Wyse

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.