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I installed Ubuntu 12.10 on top of Win 7 as a dual boot (awesome!). I'm hoping to use VirtualBox to run my original Win7 instance as a guest OS under Ubuntu. I found this existing question and followed the directions to no avail.

I can get the VMDK file created but when I run it I just get a blank black screen with no additional information and Windows never loads. I see no HD activity or anything that would indicate it's loading.

I used this command to create the VMDK file:

VBoxManager internalcommands createrawvmdk -filename ~/.VirtualBox/Win7Native.vmdk -rawdisk /dev/sda3

It looks like everything was created correctly but I just get a blank screen when I run the VM.

I do get this warning when I boot the VM:

VirtualBox - Warning

The virtual machine execution may run into and error condition as described below...

The medium '/home/XXX/.VirtualBox/Win7Native.vmdk' has a logical size of 583GB but the file system the medium is located on can only handle up to 16GB in theory.

We strongly recommend to put all your virtual disk images and the snapshot folder on a proper file system (e.g. etc3) with a sufficient size.

ErrorId: Fat Partition Detected Severity: Warning

How can I get this working?

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try running gksudo virtualbox to start virtualbox; I tried this a while ago and (if I remember correctly) virtualbox needs to run as root to be able to read and write from the partition –  jackweirdy Dec 15 '12 at 15:52
    
Thanks but that's not the issue in this case. I did as you suggested but still get a blank screen. –  kingdango Dec 15 '12 at 15:57
    
try running with gksudo virtualbox --debug-command-line to get some activity logs up –  jackweirdy Dec 15 '12 at 15:59
    
did that, something prints but then a bunch of buffer: -- statements print and fill the buffer –  kingdango Dec 15 '12 at 16:10
    
It could be a Windows problem to me. A sudden change of hardware (like moving from real to virtualized one) usually breaks Windows. You can avoid it by using Hardware profiles in Windows, but I don't know exactly how they work. –  Javier Rivera Dec 18 '12 at 9:07
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