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alright so guys i am trying to do a direct boot for Ubuntu 12.10 (as stated in the topic) i have been trying to do a direct boot for about ten minutes now.

so i have to do a direct boot because my original OS has a corrupted kernel (i am trying to fix a friends laptop)

Toshiba satellite C655D-S5518

anyway getting back to the main point when i put the usb in everything starts up fine it loads the usb then it goes to this screen saying "SYSLINUX 4.06 EDD 2012-10-23 Copyright (C) 1994-2012 H. Peter Anvin et al."

also getting a blinking line (as if i could put something in however when i try to type it does not show up so im guessing its telling me it is loading)

However i am not getting a corrupted file or any kind of file error so im guessing my main question is, is this normal? and if so how long does it take for this to be done and what are the steps proceeding this? sorry guys if this is a dumb question i am new to the Ubuntu party haha thanks

Logan.

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marked as duplicate by Luis Alvarado May 1 '13 at 20:36

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2 Answers 2

I had this problem in the past and I believe I solved it using Unetbootin version 494 instead of the latest.

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It'd help if you could detail how you're trying to create your bootable USB. There are a number of guides on how to do this online with different ones working in different ways.

If all you want is a bootable USB with Ubuntu for fixing a computer, use UNetbootin. It extracts the ISO to the USB and set it up to be bootable. It's probably worth reformatting your USB first, just to be sure it's going to work properly.

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ok what format should i use? ntfs? –  logan Dec 6 '12 at 3:18
    
You can use NTFS or FAT32; it's up to you. I personally would recommend FAT32, because NTFS support by syslinux is new (compared to FAT32 anyhow). If you find one doesn't work for you, try the other. –  YodaDaCoda Dec 6 '12 at 3:28

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