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How can I easily know which version of a package (in this case perl) is shipped with each and every version of ubuntu?

For example:

I'm running ubuntu 12.04 LTS and my perl version is 5.14.2 and I want to know how to find out the version it was before I updated the system. Something like this list:

  • Ubuntu 10.04 = Perl 5.10
  • Ubuntu 11.04 = Perl 5.12
  • Ubuntu 12.04 = Perl 5.14.2
  • and so on...
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use packages.ubuntu.com for that.

Example: http://packages.ubuntu.com/precise/perl at the top shows Package: perl (5.14.2-6ubuntu2). http://packages.ubuntu.com/lucid/perl shows Package: perl (5.10.1-8ubuntu2.1).

This works for other software too.

You can also search for perl and get a list with all releases like so: http://packages.ubuntu.com/search?suite=default&section=all&arch=any&searchon=names&keywords=perl

This will show:

hardy (perl): Larry Wall's Practical Extraction and Report Language
5.8.8-12ubuntu0.5 [security]: amd64 i386
hardy-updates (perl): Larry Wall's Practical Extraction and Report Language
5.8.8-12ubuntu0.5: amd64 i386
lucid (perl): Larry Wall's Practical Extraction and Report Language
5.10.1-8ubuntu2.1 [security]: amd64 i386
lucid-updates (perl): Larry Wall's Practical Extraction and Report Language
5.10.1-8ubuntu2.1: amd64 i386
oneiric (perl): Larry Wall's Practical Extraction and Report Language
5.12.4-4: amd64 i386
precise (perl): Larry Wall's Practical Extraction and Report Language
5.14.2-6ubuntu2: amd64 i386
precise-updates (perl): Larry Wall's Practical Extraction and Report Language
5.14.2-6ubuntu2.1: amd64 i386
quantal (perl): Larry Wall's Practical Extraction and Report Language
5.14.2-13: amd64 i386
raring (perl): Larry Wall's Practical Extraction and Report Language
5.14.2-14: amd64 i386
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