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I have an AIR 2.0 application which makes a request to the server which can take more than 1 minute. Sadly due to this bug the request timeouts after 30 seconds. There is a workaround, but is only available for Windows. Could you tell me how to do the same thing in Ubuntu 10.04?

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If I understand it correctly this command will make the same thing on linux that this registry tweak in windows:

sudo sysctl net.ipv4.tcp_fin_timeout=100

Where 100 is the timeout in seconds to forcibly close a socket. Note that:

  • Default value in Ubuntu is 60 seconds, not 30.
  • This will be enforced by the kernel. So it can have some effect in other apps. I expect them only if you lower it, but who knows.
  • I can't understand how can this be related to that bug in AIR.

From the tcp man page:

tcp_fin_timeout (integer; default: 60) This specifies how many seconds to wait for a final FIN packet before the socket is forcibly closed. This is strictly a violation of the TCP specification, but required to prevent denial-of-service attacks. In Linux 2.2, the default value was 180.

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Thank you for your answer, but sadly changing this doesn't stop my Air application timeout after 30 seconds. –  Ionel Bratianu Jan 12 '11 at 9:02
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No surprise, as I said the default value was 60. We need to know where does AIR for Linux get it's timeout setting from. But given that it's closed source it doesn't look simple, likely only Adobe can help you. I never seen Adobe people here, so you should probably ask them in their bug tracker. –  Javier Rivera Jan 12 '11 at 10:28
    
The bug report that you link looks like windows only and Internet Explorer only. –  Javier Rivera Jan 12 '11 at 10:35
    
The interesting stuff is that this bug was reported also in Flex bugs.adobe.com/jira/browse/SDK-22016 and there when the bug was closed they use the term "OS default timeout on Mac and Linux". I don't have any idea where this thing can be changed up. –  Ionel Bratianu Jan 12 '11 at 10:57
    
The problem is to know what is that "OS default timeout".. –  Javier Rivera Jan 12 '11 at 11:48
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