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I'm looking at ways to reduce the amount of space taken up by my large collection of music, mostly Ogg Vorbis with the occasional MP3. What prompted this was thinking ahead to potentially using an Ubuntu tablet with limited storage. Consequently, I thought of writing a script to gzip each track (i.e. foobar.ogg becomes foobar.ogg.gz).

The problem is, I then need an audio player smart enough to decompress the gzipped music on the fly, find out what format it actually is and play it as normal. I realise that I could probably do this from the command line by unzipping each track to stdout and piping it to mplayer or something but I'm really looking for a desktop application.

Google didn't turn up anything conclusive, so is anyone else doing this and if so how?

Thanks.

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MP3 and OGG are already compressed itself. You will probably not get much out of this. I have even seen cases where the archive was bigger than the compresses mp3. –  André Stannek Nov 4 '12 at 13:35
    
Strange, I tried compressing some tracks and they were smaller by a good couple of MB. –  James Nov 4 '12 at 13:36
    
Tried it myself. You are right, if I do it with gz it is actually 10-15% smaller. I think when I tried it a few years ago it was with zip. I know that xbmc can play videos directly from archives, but it is more of a media center for a htpc than a media player suitable for desktop. You should also take into account that decompressing cost CPU power and could decrease the battery time of your tablet but I don't know how much it would be. –  André Stannek Nov 4 '12 at 13:46
    
Update: those were MP3s, but Vorbis files are still reduced in size by 0.1MB or such. That doesn't sound like much, but over all my music I could still save several gigabytes. –  James Nov 4 '12 at 13:46
    
"You should also take into account that decompressing cost CPU power and could decrease the battery time of your tablet but I don't know how much it would be." That's true but I thought of gzip rather than bzip or something for that reason, as it's fairly efficient. –  James Nov 4 '12 at 13:47
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1 Answer 1

I know of two solutions:

  1. Use DeaDBeeF with the RAR, 7z and Gzip archive reader plugin.

  2. Run foobar2000 through Wine with the Unix Archive Support component. This is kind of cheating since it's a Windows program, but I do this since foobar2000 is my player of choice.

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