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What program starts the per user session dbus-daemon process in GNOME 2 and GNOME 3 (presumably via dbus-launch)? I would like to know because I would like to add a directory to the list of directories that dbus-daemon checks for .service files.

(Obviously if it's a sh program, "sh" isn't the answer I'm looking for ;-)

How could I have answered this question for myself efficiently? What documentation is there on desktop and session startup?

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So, no luck still? –  mlvljr Feb 16 '13 at 21:06
    
The question is still unanswered, correct. –  Croad Langshan Mar 8 '13 at 23:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The login manager starts dbus via the Xsession scripts directory. If the use-session-dbus option is set for the Xsession, then the dbus Xsession script is loaded, and it runs dbus-launch --exit-with-session $session_command.

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So if dbus-launch starts the session manager, then the session manager is not the program that starts dbus-launch, so that doesn't appear to answer the question? –  Croad Langshan Oct 29 '12 at 19:46
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As it happens the reason that I want to add a directory that is checked for .service files is that I'm doing a non-root install. So I can't create session-local.conf. I can always start a second dbus-daemon, but I'd like to avoid that if possible (partly for parsimony, partly because it seems dbus-launch processes get left behind after the program that it ran exited, so it's not easy to write a well-behaving shell alias that runs a program using dbus-launch). –  Croad Langshan Oct 29 '12 at 19:48
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Why do you need to install a .service file at all? Do you actually need to use the activation feature of dbus? Your question doesn't really say what you're trying to do exactly; which would probably be easier to answer, as dbus-daemon/dbus-launch could get started a large number of different ways, depending on what session the user is running. –  dobey Oct 29 '12 at 21:15
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You asked 3 questions. Pick one. :) –  dobey Nov 1 '12 at 4:06
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The first one: What program starts dbus-daemon? –  Croad Langshan Dec 22 '12 at 18:58

Starting of the majority of tasks and services during boot including Dbus daemon is handled by Upstart.

Dbus daemon is not started per user session but on mounting the last local filesystem. Upstart job configuration handling starting/stopping/monitoring of Dbus daemon can be found in /etc/init/dbus.conf.

You can use user job to start Hamster on graphical login.

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I checked this as accepted answer, then realised that that script starts the "system" dbus-daemon (with argument --system). I hear what you say about not being started per user session, but then why do I have two dbus-daemon processes (in fact, three, but the third one looks less interesting)? One looks like the one started by that init file, the other has argument --session (amongst other arguments) instead of argument --system –  Croad Langshan Mar 9 '13 at 18:41
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That will be specific to your setup. Your question was as per comment 5: What program starts dbus-daemon? More information on starting per session message buss you can find here. –  schkovich Mar 9 '13 at 19:18
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Hi schkovich. That comment was to help out dobey, who seemed unsure whether my "how could I have answered this for myself" was a further two questions rather than, as it was, an invitation/reminder to "teach a man to fish". If you take a look at the original question, you'll see what it's about in more detail: explicitly session, not system. By the way, thanks for your answer: I was happy to upvote it as useful info, even if not directly answering my question. –  Croad Langshan Mar 9 '13 at 19:28
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The most important is that you got the answer to your question and that each of us has learned a bit more about Ubuntu. :) –  schkovich Mar 9 '13 at 19:35

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