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I'm new to these forums so I'll be quick.

When I try to upgrade to Ubuntu 10.10 from 10.04 I get this error, I have tried upgrading from Terminal and Update Manager as well.

Could not determine the upgrade
An unresolvable problem occurred while calculating the upgrade:
E:Error, pkgProblemResolver::Resolve generated breaks, this may be
caused by held packages.
This can be caused by:
* Upgrading to a pre-release version of Ubuntu
* Running the current pre-release version of Ubuntu
* Unofficial software packages not provided by Ubuntu
If none of this applies, then please report this bug against the
'update-manager' package and include the files in
/var/log/dist-upgrade/ in the bug report.
Restoring original system state
Thanks
Aborting

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2 Answers

This is a known bug: Bug #606652.

Possible Workaround:

  • Uninstall xserver-xorg-video-all (and xserver-xorg-video-nouveau).

  • Upgrade.

  • Install xserver-xorg-video-all (and xserver-xorg-video-nouveau).

You can subscribe to a bug and follow its progress.

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I use Ubuntu since version 6.x, and every time I wanted to do an upgrade, I experienced problems and issues, mostly related to packages and sometime related to hardware. And every time, I finally found that it would have been easier to simply reinstall Ubuntu, despite the fact that I then have to reinstall my applications. But I see several advantages to this:

  1. You have to backup all your data to another device, since a full install also means erasing your hard disk, unless you planned id and had your data in another partition. Having a backup is always a good idea, and never hurts.
  2. You only have the applications that you need, no more "left-overs" of other applications you installed. It is easy to install all kinds of programs as you find them. but do you remove them once you're done ?
  3. Given all possible programs and utilities that are installed, and may not be ready for the new version of the distro, an upgrade to a new version is unlikely to upgrade those packages. Incompatibilities, missing libraries, etc... that can happen so easily.....
  4. It also gives you a chance to cleanup your files, and if you re-do the file system you eliminate all fragmentation issues that can happen in any file system, under any OS.

Yes, more work, but also a better system at the end. And this is also true of other OSes. However with Linux, the $$$ cost is the same, whether this is an upgrade or a full reinstall: ZERO. Other OSes will charge you different prices depending on whether this is an upgrade or a full install.

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