Take the 2-minute tour ×
Ask Ubuntu is a question and answer site for Ubuntu users and developers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How to open apps in Ubuntu 12.04 to read documents, play music and video, surf the net and reading emails?

share|improve this question
2  
Use dash. To open dash press 'Super key/Windows key'. For Documents - Libreoffice, Evince. For Music - Rhythmbox . For video- Totem . Surf the net - Chrome/Firefox. For Email- Thunderbird/Evolution . These apps come by default on Ubuntu. Other than this there good apps which can be found on Ubuntu Software Center. –  devav2 Oct 5 '12 at 19:46
    
@devav2, this is more an answer than a comment ;) –  Boris Oct 5 '12 at 20:18
    
@devav2 I made a CW answer for you. Is that OK? –  hexafraction Oct 5 '12 at 20:27
    
@ObsessiveFOSS Great :) –  devav2 Oct 5 '12 at 20:30
    
To open a document, it seems more up to date to me to open the document and let the OS decide what app is associated with that document. So, if I wanted to open a music file called, for example, "Puff the Tragic Wagon," I would just open the dash, type "Puff" and hit enter; then the song would play. –  Marty Fried Oct 5 '12 at 20:57
show 1 more comment

2 Answers

As per @devav2:

Use dash. To open dash press 'Super key/Windows key'. For Documents - Libreoffice, Evince. For Music - Rhythmbox . For video- Totem . Surf the net - Chrome/Firefox. For Email- Thunderbird/Evolution . These apps come by default on Ubuntu. Other than this there good apps which can be found on Ubuntu Software Center

Libreoffice is like Microsoft Office and supports most of its formats.

enter image description here

To listen to music, you can use Rhythmbox. Video can be played with Totem.

enter image description here

TO surf the web, you can use Firefox, or Chromium if you install it in the Ubuntu Software Center.

enter image description here

To read email on your computer, use Thunderbird or Evince. You can open any of these by clicking the top left button in the launcher(dock-like thing at the left with all the buttons) and typing the name of a program. You can install many more useful things with the Ubuntu Software Center. Many applications there are free, and can be installed as easily as clicking the Install button and giving your password.

share|improve this answer
    
Image from dash. –  penreturns Oct 5 '12 at 20:46
    
@penreturn Thanks! –  hexafraction Oct 5 '12 at 20:47
    
No problem Sir. ;) –  penreturns Oct 5 '12 at 20:50
add comment

It depends on your preferences. You can simply press the super, or Win key (usually between Alt and Ctrl), or press the icon at the top of the Unity Panel (Dash Home) to bring up the Dash. If you know the name, or part of the name, of an app, file, or folder, you can simply start typing until it appears at the top-left of the list of potential targets, then press return or click on the icon. This is probably the quickest way to run a program whose name you know.

I have found that sometimes, whatever I do, the left super key will only bring up the list of keyboard shortcuts, which is very annoying; if this happens, press the corresponding right super key instead (this is the only way to dismiss the window). I think this may be a bug, since it isn't documented to work this way

If you don't know the name of the program or document, then notice that at the bottom of the panel that appears, you'll see several icons, which represent filters, or lenses, that categorize what is shown. You can click on these, or press Ctrl + Tab to cycle through them. The second one on the left is a list of all apps, and can lead you to any app either installed or potentially installable.

If you want to open a music file, and you know the name, it's better to search for this than to open an app, then search for the music file. This is considered a more modern method of user interface; you don't need to care about the name of the application that is used to open your file. In fact, the application name can change, but your method of opening the file doesn't need to change in that case.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.