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ubuntu 10.04.4 LTS after power outage system hangs on boot at checking battery state ===>ok

I could do with knowing if

  1. putting a setup disc in & reinstalling will wipe the data off or not.
  2. anyone has a fix for this problem so that I can get back to the data.
  3. anyone knows a way of getting the data off onto a temp win disc.

Thanks in advance for looking at this post.

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Live USB and gksudo nautilus should open Nautilus in admin mode. –  user68186 Oct 2 '12 at 18:36

3 Answers 3

Did you try using an Ubuntu LiveCD to boot into live mode? The system will run from your RAM and the data on your hard disk will remain untouched, as far as I know. You can then connect an external drive to copy and backup your data before you do anything else.

For the future, please spend a little more time wording your question and do a regular backup, for example with CrasPlan Backup.

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Hi guys, all sorted now, a BIG thanks to you all for your help. Got all data copied onto a temp drive, nothing missing. Thanks again everyone for your speedy replies. Keep up the good work... –  John Radcliffe Oct 2 '12 at 23:12
  1. Yes, reinstalling will wipe everything in your hard disk drive BUT ONLY IF YOU CHOOSE IT to do so. I mean, during the OS's Install you will be prompted to choose if you wish to install side by side, wipe the previous install or something else. If you choose to wipe it out we can say goodbye to your data. If you choose to install it side by side you will be asked to determine the partition's size of your new install. Of course, the hard disk drive free space should be enough to include a new install (at least 4GB in my experience). This will also install a bootloader which may solve your boot problem in the current damaged install, which takes me to the second point:
  2. I don't have a fix for your problem, sorry. Nevertheless, I suggest you to run a search in this site for "fixing bootloader", "grub fix" and these things in order to get further details on how to fix your boot problems.
  3. We can say for sure that the data is right there but you can't acces it because of the OS won't boot. So, if you use a Live CD/USB Session you should be able to recover your data, copy and back it up in a different hard disk drive and redo from scratch with a new installation when you are satisfied with the backup results. This process of "booting via live session" won't harm your data just if you use a Ubuntu OS for the process, I can't guarantee it for sure if you use a different OS.

Please let us know how are you managing this issue. I'll be around tomorrow in order to provide some support if needed but some other excellent supporters are by here.

Good luck!

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Thanks very much to you all for your help & so fast too, the problem I have now after booting to a live usb session is that I can't copy the data as I am not the owner of the files. I can see all the folders but no files. I have been looking for a way to take ownership of the home folder & contents but seem to be getting lots of conflicting info, being new to Ubuntu & being thrown in at the deep end I could do with some expert guidance. –  John Radcliffe Oct 2 '12 at 9:23
2  
@JohnRadcliffe This might be a stupid idea, but: Did you try copying them with sudo cp [arguments] in the terminal? –  Konstantin Oct 2 '12 at 18:45
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Not a stupid idea - it should work. But after testing, I added a different approach that may be better. –  Marty Fried Oct 2 '12 at 18:52
1  
Hi guys, all sorted now, a BIG thanks to you all for your help. Got all data copied onto a temp drive, nothing missing. Thanks again everyone for your speedy replies. Keep up the good work... –  John Radcliffe Oct 2 '12 at 23:12
1  
@JohnRadcliffe, how did you get the files copied in the end? What was the reason why it didn't work on the first attempt? You might also consider accepting an answer. –  Konstantin Oct 3 '12 at 0:47

I think that your best approach is the reverse order of your questions. No matter which strategy you use, you should first get the data onto a safe place, so if anything fails, you will have the data.

The best way to get the data is probably to use a live CD or live USB "setup disk"; the normal install disk for any version would work, as would any alternate Linux disk. If you were using NTFS or FAT for Linux, Windows could do it directly, but Windows doesn't read the Linux format.

But using a Linux disk, you can access both the Windows partition, and the Linux partition, and should be able to copy the files from one to the other in whatever method is most comfortable to you - either using a GUI filemanager or a terminal command line. If you use a GUI, you probably should show hidden files so you don't miss anything.

Once you have a backup of your files, you can probably reinstall without formatting to recover your system, although there would probably be a lot of updates required to get back up to date. I've never had to do this, so I'm not sure how it will work. Perhaps someone will chime in with specific experience.

Additional info:

I just tried using a 12.04 live CD on one of my computers, and I found that indeed, the files in my home directory were locked to me as a normal user (username "ubuntu"). The files are owned by user 1000, but user ubuntu is 999. So I can see two alternatives.

A. I think this is the best way. Open a terminal and enter these commands:

sudo adduser tempuser --uid 1000

This creates a new user with an id of 1000, which is the default for Ubuntu. You may not need a password, but I used "1" in my test. Just press enter for all the other questions to pick the defaults.

su tempuser

You are now logged in as tempuser, with a user ID of 1000, and now have access to the files in your old home directory. To "log out" of the temp account, enter "exit" at the commandline.

B. Use root access to copy the files. You can use a commandline, and use either "sudo" with each command (no password needed), or enter sudo su to become root, and then enter commands without sudo.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much to you all for your help & so fast too, the problem I have now after booting to a live usb session is that I can't copy the data as I am not the owner of the files. I can see all the folders but no files. I have been looking for a way to take ownership of the home folder & contents but seem to be getting lots of conflicting info, being new to Ubuntu & being thrown in at the deep end I could do with some expert guidance. –  John Radcliffe Oct 2 '12 at 12:40
    
I added "Additional info" to my answer. Perhaps this will help. If not, let me know. –  Marty Fried Oct 2 '12 at 18:27

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