Take the 2-minute tour ×
Ask Ubuntu is a question and answer site for Ubuntu users and developers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I get the following output when I run xrandr:

Screen 0: minimum 320 x 200, current 1280 x 800, maximum 8192 x 8192
LVDS1 connected 1280x800+0+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 304mm x 190mm
   1280x800       60.0*+
   1024x768       60.0  
   800x600        60.3     56.2  
   640x480        59.9  
VGA1 disconnected (normal left inverted right x axis y axis)
HDMI1 disconnected (normal left inverted right x axis y axis)
DP1 disconnected (normal left inverted right x axis y axis)
DP2 disconnected (normal left inverted right x axis y axis)

Please give me a suggestion how to get 1366x768.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

To work with an old CRT monitor, add the following to your xorg.conf:

before:

Section "Screen"
    Identifier  "Default Screen"
    Option  "AddARGBGLXVisuals" "True"
EndSection

Section "Device"
    Identifier  "Default Device"
    Option  "NoLogo"    "True"
EndSection

after:

Section "Screen"
    Identifier  "Default Screen"
    Option  "AddARGBGLXVisuals" "True"
    Device         "Device0"
    Monitor        "Monitor0"
    DefaultDepth    24
    Option         "TwinView" "0"
    Option         "TwinViewXineramaInfoOrder" "CRT-0"
    Option         "metamodes" "1024x768 +0+0; 800x600 +0+0"
    SubSection     "Display"
        Depth       24
    EndSubSection
EndSection

Section "Device"
    Identifier  "Default Device"
    Option  "NoLogo"    "True"
EndSection

Section "Monitor"
    Identifier     "Monitor0"
    VendorName     "Unknown"
    ModelName      "CRT-0"
    HorizSync       30.0 - 110.0
    VertRefresh     50.0 - 150.0
    Option         "DPMS"
EndSection

and get a stable flicker free workable screen.

share|improve this answer
    
His monitor is probably not a CRT, according to his xrandr output. (LVDS1 is his laptop screen, laptops with CRTs are quite extinct.) –  R110 May 4 '13 at 11:26

I prefer to do panning on small laptop screens instead of scaling down

xrandr --fb 1600x1200 --output LVDS1 --panning 1600x1200

share|improve this answer
    
Are there any advantages to it? –  Abhishek Gupta Nov 13 '13 at 22:47

There's only one screen connected: LVDS1, which supports these resolutions:

   1280x800       60.0*+
   1024x768       60.0  
   800x600        60.3     56.2  
   640x480        59.9  

The * marks the current resolution, the + the preferred one by this screen.

Since 1366x768 isn't in the list, I'm afraid you can't set that specific resolution for this connected screen.

A possibility could be to scale the output resolution down to your monitors resolution. I tried this and it only worked on some systems. Additionally, there's an unresolved bug regarding a restriction of the mouse movement.

For example:

xrandr --output LVDS1 --mode 1280x800 --scale 1.2x1.2

This will give you 1.2 times your native resolution, but the screen output gets downscaled, so the output will look worse than at native resolution.

You could try to force another resolution, but be warned, some monitors could be damaged by this:

xrandr --output LVDS1 --mode 1366x768

More info: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/X/Config/Resolution

share|improve this answer
    
jitesh@jitesh-Compaq-Presario-CQ40-Notebook-PC:~$ xrandr -s 1366x768 Size 1366x768 not found in available modes jitesh@jitesh-Compaq-Presario-CQ40-Notebook-PC:~$ xrandr --output LVDS1 --mode 1366x768 xrandr: cannot find mode 1366x768 jitesh@jitesh-Compaq-Presario-CQ40-Notebook-PC:~$ –  jitesh Sep 19 '12 at 5:09
    
My Laptop is Compaq-Presario-CQ40 14" Screen –  jitesh Sep 19 '12 at 5:11
    
There's usually no good reason to not use your screens native resolution. The output quality is much worse if you don't use it. Besides, there's not that much different in pixel count for 1366*768 = 1 049 088 and 1280*800 1 024 000. But you could try downscaling - I've added info for that in my answer. –  phoibos Sep 19 '12 at 11:03

According to that output, your laptop's native resolution is 1280x800, not 1376x768. Which laptop is it? You can run xrandr -s 1366x768, but it likely won't work, given your hardware seems to report it doesn't support that resolution.

share|improve this answer

protected by Community Sep 15 '13 at 5:17

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.