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Adobe will stop releasing new versions of Flash - what will happen to flash support in Ubuntu?

I have heard Adobe claims they stopped developing Flash Player for Linux in an effort to get more people to make stuff in HTML5. What they HAVE done, is forced me to use Windows more.

If their excuse is really what they claim, then why don't they stop developing Flash for Windows or Mac? Wouldn't you think that is more effective?

Also, if I were to install Windows version of Flash in WINE, would that help the Flash games I play be less glitchy?

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marked as duplicate by Tom Brossman, hhlp, Stephen Myall, fossfreedom Dec 4 '12 at 12:37

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You might want to read askubuntu.com/questions/172783 –  IgnitE Sep 11 '12 at 23:52

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up vote 9 down vote accepted

Eventually they will stop developing Flash at all, for all platforms. They only stopped releasing new releases of Flash for Linux, but they still ship bug fixes.

I have flash from Adobe on Ubuntu and it run's just fine, no glitches at all. If you don't like flash there are open alternatives like Gnash or Lightspark.

There's no need to install Flash through Wine (not sure if it would work), what you need to do is to install Adobe Flash for Linux version 11 something.

Also Google Chrome ships it's own Flash version, so there's another alternative right there.

Offical note from Adobe about dropping Flash

"The last version of a separate Flash Player for Linux, 11.2, will be released this quarter, Adobe announced in the roadmap document. After that, Linux users who require browser-based Flash must switch to Chrome, Google's three-year-old browser. ...

Adobe has been collaborating with Google, the former said, on Pepper implementation for Flash, which will let it create a single plug-in for all systems that Chrome supports. In other words, the same Flash Player plug-in will run in Chrome on Windows, Mac OS X and Linux."

Source

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"forget flash" ... what is an irrelevant sound :D –  swift Jul 23 at 13:37
    
Unfortunately i think Flash will be here for a while –  LnxSlck Oct 24 at 8:32

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