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I have an ASUS MB with an NVIDIA RAID 0 array set up as my boot disc with 200Gb unformatted ready for Ubuntu. Will WUBI install onto this?

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2 Answers 2

WUBI wont install into the unformatted (unallocated) disk space. WUBI will install in a virtual file system within Windows, where Ubuntu will reside completely in C:\Ubuntu\root.disk. WUBI is for those who do not want to (or cannot) partition the hard drive, and yet want to try out Ubuntu.

Compared with a regular installation, a Wubi installation faces some limitations. The filesystem is more vulnerable to hard reboots. Also, if the Windows partition is unmounted uncleanly (Windows crash, power failure, etc.), Ubuntu will not be able to mount the Windows partition and boot until Windows has successfully booted and shut down. If the Windows system cannot be booted after the crash, the user also cannot boot Ubuntu. Performance related to hard-disk access is also slightly slower, more so if the disk image file is fragmented, on a Wubi install compared to a normal one. Read more on WUBI.

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can I then install a normal Ubuntu with grub to this setup? I have tried many years previously and it failed to see the raid array as a boot device? –  DrRussT Aug 29 '12 at 20:09
    
Sorry, I don't know enough about RAID to tell you how to do it. –  user68186 Aug 29 '12 at 20:23

If you want to install from windows, you can go ahead and do so. But you will have to assemble the raid on a live CD and install grub to a valid boot-able partition.

Now, If i remember correctly, the common "fakeraids"(the kind you enable in the bios) have a boot partition for assembly and for windows to use.
So you should be able to select that.
You can also use a separate drive Like a USB

Of course.. I could be wrong.

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