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I started to use Ubuntu two weeks ago, I still have some difficulty in understanding the whole world of Linux.

I'm in front of the following scenario:

I have a Windows computer running 12.04 in a VirtualBox, I've installed in Ubuntu samba and proftpd, because I've limited the Ubuntu HD to 8GB. I had the idea to use a shared Windows folder to use as my main FTP storage place.

In /etc/fstab I've added the following line

//192.168.0.10/D$/ /mnt/FTP cifs user,umask=0022,gid=0,uid=0,suid,username="####",password=##### 0 0

I can mount my partition with mount /mnt/FTP, I can access, but I cannot create anything in the directory.

The permission of the directory is dr-xr-xr-x 0 root root.

I want to have the permissions, but how can I do it?


Was my fault to not test direct by Linux before posting, I've verified if I could create or change anything direct in ssh while I was writing, first of all I've tested using FTP.

I've tried right now to chmod -R 777 /mnt/FTP, and I got permission denied error, I'm logged in my virtual Linux with ssh.


I've unmounted the /mnt/FTP and I could chmod 777 the folder, but the permission of the containing files inside the /mnt/FTP still dr-xr-xr-x.

And can't change their permissions. How can I solve this problem?

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Directory permissions are set with the CHMOD command. Here's a wiki article on it - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chmod - There's some helpful commands and some explanation on what you're seeing when you see dr-xr-xr-x or any variation thereof. –  cloyd800 Aug 23 '12 at 1:55
    
Why are you using the word FTP at all? It's a Samba share and has nothing to do with FTP. –  Sergey Aug 23 '12 at 2:18
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1 Answer

I'm a new user and Linux is a bit complicated yet to me. I think I found the solution dir_mode=0777, file_mode=0777 in the /etc/fstab.

My problem is now solved. The problem was the permission in the fstab.

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