Take the 2-minute tour ×
Ask Ubuntu is a question and answer site for Ubuntu users and developers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I installed Ubuntu successfully by using acpi=off and nolapic. When I booted into the installed operating system, all that the screen showed was several multi colored bars (This must have been my 10,000th installation attempt.)

I decided to get rid of Ubuntu by simply deleting the partition and re-partitioning it as a blank drive. This caused an error on boot.

error: unknown filesystem.
grub rescue>

I reinstalled Ubuntu so I could get Grub working again and boot into Windows 7, but I want grub and Ubuntu gone for good.

I am running the MSI GT683DX with

  • IntelCore i7-2670QM
  • NVIDIA GTX 570m / 1.5 GDDR5
  • 750GB HDD 7200 RPM
  • 12GB of DDR3 RAM

I also ran the Windows startup repair tool several times. I cannot access my full Ubuntu installation (Although I can get to a terminal through live USB I would prefer to just solve this in Windows).

I tried to run sudo apt-get install boot-info-script but I get

ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ sudo apt-get install boot-info-script
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree       
Reading state information... Done
E: Unable to locate package boot-info-script

This is the output I get from 'fdisk -l'

ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ sudo fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sda: 750.2 GB, 750156374016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 91201 cylinders, total 1465149168 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x9401091d

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1            2048    23207935    11602944   27  Hidden NTFS WinRE
/dev/sda2   *    23207936    23412735      102400   27  Hidden NTFS WinRE
/dev/sda3        23412736   888453119   432520192    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda4      1449523198  1465147391     7812097    5  Extended
Partition 4 does not start on physical sector boundary.
/dev/sda5      1449523200  1465147391     7812096   83  Linux

Disk /dev/sdb: 16.0 GB, 16008609792 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 1946 cylinders, total 31266816 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdb1   *          32    31266815    15633392    c  W95 FAT32 (LBA)

Partition 4 is 276gb of unallocated space. sda5 is obviously the ubuntu installation. I did not use a swap space partition because I only installed ubuntu so I could boot into windows.

sda1 is the recovery I believe.

share|improve this question
    
There are ways to fix this using a combination of a Ubuntu liveCD and then your Windows boot media. However, seeing as how you say you "want a way to fix this through WINDOWS, not UBUNTU", I might suggest that askUbuntu is probably not the place to ask this question. You might try a Microsoft oriented help site. –  adempewolff Aug 22 '12 at 6:30
    
Anything to fix the problem. I would prefer a windows based solution. The windows help sites have been useless. "Use the windows startup repair tool" –  Micheal Earl Aug 22 '12 at 6:32
    
Well, if you are willing to use linux tools to fix the problem, start by posting the output of sudo fdisk -l this will give us an idea of what your partition table looks like. –  adempewolff Aug 22 '12 at 6:36
    
What's exactly the problem with using the windows startup repair tool? –  jeremija Aug 22 '12 at 6:37
    
No startup issues are found when using the repair tool. –  Micheal Earl Aug 22 '12 at 6:39

1 Answer 1

Use at your own risk! Messing with mbr may lead hard disk corruption. Backup your data before you start.

  1. Boot the Windows Vista or Windows 7 installation disc in the disc drive.
  2. Press a key when you are prompted.
  3. Select a language, a time, a currency, a keyboard or an input method, and then click Next.
  4. Click Repair your computer.
  5. Click the operating system that you want to repair, and then click Next.
  6. In the System Recovery Options dialog box, click Command Prompt.

If you successfully spawned the cmd run the following commands:

1. bcdedit /export C:\BCD_Backup
2. c: (use the letter of your DVD drive)
3. cd boot
4. attrib bcd -s -h -r
5. ren c:\boot\bcd bcd.old
6. bootrec /RebuildBcd
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.