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Background

My friend has got Windows 7 and Ubuntu installed in his Laptop's internal drive and Ubuntu on External Drive. Recently, there is some problem with his Internal HDD and it seems to me like there's some problem with the sectors in some of his internal drive's partitions. There's an NTFS logical partition in the internal drive where lots of data is stored.

He decided to use External drive as the main drive for a while, but needs the data on Internal drive.

Problem

Whenever the internal drive's failed partitions (Ubuntu and Windows 7 installation drives) are accessed, the system hangs/crashes. Even while running update for Ubuntu on External drive, the system hangs when update-grub runs at the end. So, obviously he is still running pretty much a live disk. Deleting those partitions is not possible, because when you open a disk manager (say Gparted) that scans the internal drive system hangs/crashes.

Question

  • How to make some partitions invisible to Ubuntu?
  • How to delete partitions without needing to scan the drive they are present on?

There was already a question that asked how to make partitions invisible to Ubuntu, but that was about NTFS partition. Here we have both NTFS and ext4 to exclude.

Long question Short: How to exclude partitions (say /dev/sda3) from being accessed for whatever reason(but not delete them)? However, if deleting them is the only way to do it, please tell it - I am not sure about this.

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Linux doesn't really do 'invisible'. It kind of goes against the philosophy. If it is there Linux will make it accessible. I think what you really need to do is solve your root problem - the bad sectors. Run chkdsk /f /b <Drive Letter>: from a windows boot disk and it will scan for bad sectors and mark them as such. –  Huckle Aug 31 '12 at 20:03
    
A+ on the formatting through. I really despise poorly formatted questions. –  Huckle Aug 31 '12 at 20:04
    
@Huckle: it's surprising to know that linux is against "whatever you want to do" in this case... I think that philosophy seems more like linux than not making it invisible...?? Thanks for that! I have learned to format questions properly in the questions I asked recently elsewhere on stack exchange... I think I have still a lot to learn! ;) –  Forbidden Overseer Sep 3 '12 at 21:19
2  
Linux's philosophy isn't so much "Do whatever you want" as much as "Here is a well-defined, consistent, transparent framework with which you can do what you want". Part of the transparent part is that everything (should be) is documented and that it is there when you expect it to be (i.e., not hidden) –  Huckle Sep 9 '12 at 13:57
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