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Inspired by the "How fast" video, I've recently been trying to speed up my boot up as much as possible.

I've been reading many forums on different approaches but I've recently hit a wall with a particular problem. I've turned on verbose boot, and everything seems to move through incredibly fast except at one point, it pauses for about ten seconds on something that looks like:

'Begin running /scripts/init/bottom.... done'

Is there a reason why it is stopping at this particular point for so long? It displays "done" almost immediately. For the record, it's a fresh install.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

I displayed the scripts that ran at startup with

initctl list

The results were: -avahi-daemon start/running, process 858 -mountall-net stop/waiting -nmbd start/running, process 24028 -rc stop/waiting -rsyslog start/running, process 846 -tty4 start/running, process 941 -udev start/running, process 335 -upstart-udev-bridge start/running, process 331 -ureadahead-other stop/waiting -whoopsie start/running, process 1024 -apport start/running -console-setup stop/waiting -hwclock-save stop/waiting -irqbalance start/running, process 1027 -plymouth-log stop/waiting -smbd start/running, process 801 -tty5 start/running, process 948 -failsafe stop/waiting -hybrid-gfx stop/waiting -modemmanager start/running, process 830 -rfkill-store stop/waiting -atd start/running, process 1025 -dbus start/running, process 809 -failsafe-x stop/waiting -mounted-var stop/waiting -plymouth stop/waiting -resolvconf start/running -udev-fallback-graphics stop/waiting -control-alt-delete stop/waiting -hwclock stop/waiting -mounted-proc stop/waiting -network-manager start/running, process 841 -alsa-store stop/waiting -module-init-tools stop/waiting -setvtrgb stop/waiting -shutdown stop/waiting -alsa-restore stop/waiting -cron start/running, process 1026 -lightdm start/running, process 1166 -mountall stop/waiting -mounted-debugfs stop/waiting -binfmt-support stop/waiting -console stop/waiting -mounted-run stop/waiting -acpid start/running, process 1009 -bluetooth start/running, process 832 -plymouth-stop stop/waiting -rcS stop/waiting -ufw start/running -wait-for-state stop/waiting -flush-early-job-log stop/waiting -friendly-recovery stop/waiting -rc-sysinit stop/waiting -cups start/running, process 900 -upstart-socket-bridge start/running, process 699 -anacron stop/waiting -tty2 start/running, process 969 -udevtrigger stop/waiting -container-detect stop/waiting -mounted-dev stop/waiting -tty3 start/running, process 974 -udev-finish stop/waiting -hostname stop/waiting -mountall-reboot stop/waiting -mountall-shell stop/waiting -mounted-tmp stop/waiting -network-interface (lo) start/running -network-interface (eth0) start/running -network-interface (eth1) start/running -plymouth-splash stop/waiting -plymouth-upstart-bridge stop/waiting -tty1 start/running, process 2021 -udevmonitor stop/waiting -dmesg stop/waiting -network-interface-security (network-manager) start/running -network-interface-security (network-interface/eth1) start/running -network-interface-security (network-interface/eth0) start/running -network-interface-security (network-interface/lo) start/running -network-interface-security (networking) start/running -networking stop/waiting -procps stop/waiting -rfkill-restore stop/waiting -tty6 start/running, process 977 -network-interface-container stop/waiting -ureadahead stop/waiting

Sorry that I couldn't copy the exact bit of code it was stuck on, I've been searching through the log files in /var/log via the "Find" function, but so far I've been unable to find anything.

I have found many different boot log files, but none which display /init/bottom I mentioned above.

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My systems boot time was around 10 sec earlier, now its 30-40 sec. Most of the time is taken by the line above. :( –  Web-E Aug 18 '12 at 5:59
    
Could you give us a list of scripts you use? It might be you're making your PC to preload a lot of data to work faster, so it's normal to have longer boot times. –  Karolis Aug 18 '12 at 6:43
    
Karolis - I'd be happy to if I knew how. I'm currently attempting to look up how to show which scripts I use, but if you could offer any hints/suggestions, that'd be very helpful :) –  Billy Aug 18 '12 at 7:48
    
@Karolis - Looking around the place, I've found many promising but ultimately useless pieces of advice relating showing or editing the scripts that run at startup. I've been sent etc/init.d and various etc/rc folders, and I've installed Bootup Manager. These all showed some promise, but I'm hesitant to alter anything related to start-up unless I'm certain what it does. The fresh install I mentioned was two days ago, so I haven't added any of many own scripts unless they were added with the installation of a program. Is there a simple way to display a list of scripts which run at startup? –  Billy Aug 18 '12 at 9:27
    
I went from 4 sec clean, to 12 seconds now with no addaptions, very annoying. since I can't brag about the fast boot speed compared to windows and mac. –  Dr_Bunsen Jan 7 '13 at 17:39
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1 Answer 1

What you're seeing is the last few bits of house keeping before pivoting from the initramfs onto the real root and starting to boot real things.

You can see this point in /usr/share/initramfs-tools/init

run_scripts /scripts/init-bottom
[ "$quiet" != "y" ] && log_end_msg

That log_end_msg is your '...done', so everything after that is where you are probably seeing a delay. Its all pretty lightweight stuff. Mostly just moving global things like /sys and /proc into the real root fs and then just running init. Its also possible that init has been run, and you're at the point of 'startup', and you're now waking up your disks to mount them, and catching up on any udev events you may have missed while the rootfs was pivoted.

If you haven't tried bootchart yet, its worth a look. Just sudo apt-get install bootchart. This should tell you a lot about what the system is spending its time on during boot.

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