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I have PC (with ubuntu 12.04) connected to LAN with 100 Mbps internet speed. I created wifi hotspot on my pc with wireless usb adapter TP Link tl-wn722n, which allows up to 150 Mbps speed. With my Asus Transformer pad (tablet) I manage to connect to this wifi hotspot and it says I have excellent, 54 Mbps speed. But when I test actual speed I get 0,8 Mbps download speed and 10 Mbps upload speed.

Why is my download speed so low?

Update: I tried internet connection in windows (I have dual boot) - I get download speed 30 Mbps and upload speed 18 Mbps...

So it's obviously ubuntu that's causing slower speeds (both)...

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2 Answers 2

You have confused between local network speed and internet speed.

There are different specification for networking instrument.

I am assuming that you have some kind of modem / router in your home. The ISP connects to it.

  • The modem/router and your computer Ethernet port have capability of handling 100mbps. So when you connect to it. it shows as 100mbps connection. This is between your router and your computer ethernet port.

  • Similarly your router wireless transmitter (inside the roter) is capable of 150mbps. The asus tablet receiver has capability of 54mbps. So it connects at speed of 54mbps.


  1. Why two wireless device has different speed?

    Its depends on hardware. There are different standard for wireless. You can read in detail over here.

  2. Why I am getting 8 MBps (there's a big difference between small b and big B) speed as download speed

    This is the real speed your ISP provides. From your computer to router its 100mbps. But after router is controlled by ISP.

    So its upto your plan. If download speed (as shown in download managers)is 8 MBps [means 8 mega bytes (not mega bits) per seconds] it can be said your internet plan's allotted network speed is 8*8 = 64 mbps. (this is mega bit, 8 bit = 1 byte)

If your network speed is 8 mbps, then in download managers it would show 8/8 = 1 MBPS

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I understand that...and I know the difference between B and b - all my speeds were b. But I can not understand, why my download speed is 10 times slower than my upload speed. I tested speed on my PC - it's 100 Mbps download and 10 Mbps upload. So my usb adapter transfers upload speed without problems, but with download speed it falls from 100 Mbps to 0,8 Mbps. That can not be normal. Also, when I connect to some other wireless point I get both speeds (tested with speed test application) around 8 Mbps (and my tablet shows that this wireless has even lower speed than my usb). –  m o Aug 7 '12 at 19:25
    
Download will always be much higher than upload, unless you're, for example, connecting your computer directly to a fiberoptic internet backbone without any obstructions. Otherwise, most ISPs give you a higher download, and some fraction of that download speed-worth of the upload speed (my high-speed is 60Mbps downspeed, 10Mbps upspeed, for example) –  Thomas W. Aug 9 '12 at 13:02
    
Also, what is your ISP's speeds you're supposed to get, per your contract? –  Thomas W. Aug 9 '12 at 13:10

Is the wifi-chip from Intel? If so you may be experiencing this bug:

https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux/+bug/836250

Creating a file /etc/modprobe.d/iwlwifi.conf containing

options iwlwifi 11n_disable=1 led_mode=1 swcrypto=1

helped in my case.

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I have wireless USB adapter ( tp-link.com/en/products/details/?model=TL-WN722NC ) connected to my PC (which itself has no internal wireless chip). I'm trying to connect with this Asus: eee.asus.com/eeepad/transformer-300/features –  m o Aug 7 '12 at 18:16
1  
what is the output of lsmod | grep iwl? –  Karl Frisk Aug 8 '12 at 11:10

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