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When I try to run:

apt –get install vsftpd 

I get the error:

No command 'apt' found, did you mean:
 Command 'aptd' from package 'aptdaemon' (main)
 Command 'xapt' from package 'xapt' (universe)
 Command 'opt' from package 'llvm' (universe)
 Command 'apm' from package 'apmd' (main)
 Command 'atp' from package 'atp' (universe)
 Command 'ppt' from package 'bsdgames' (universe)
 Command 'apf' from package 'apf-firewall' (universe)
 Command 'apg' from package 'apg' (main)
 Command 'gpt' from package 'gpt' (universe)
 Command 'ant' from package 'ant' (main)
 Command 'ant' from package 'ant1.7' (universe)
 Command 'at' from package 'at' (main)
 Command 'pat' from package 'dist' (universe)
 Command 'aft' from package 'aft' (universe)
apt: command not found

What gives? -.-

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the command is 'apt-get' plus the option 'install' and then the package name. So no space in 'apt-get' –  Daniel Jul 28 '12 at 4:22
    
Thank you very much. ^_^ –  Amy Jul 28 '12 at 6:49

2 Answers 2

Try running

apt-get install vsftpd 

There shouldn't be a space after the "apt" ...

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Thanks. Clearly my n00b is showing. ^__^ –  Amy Jul 28 '12 at 6:54
    
Welcome, no worries. Been there myself –  MCR Jul 28 '12 at 7:24

As stated, the correct command is apt-get. However, you are more than likely going to need to sudo install it as the root user.. so if installing doesn't work, try sudo apt-get install vfghty and enter your password when it asks. Hopefull that works, good luck!

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absolutely correct, installing any program with the possible exception of .sh files that only install in your local /home directory WILL need to be preceded by sudo. all apt-get commands will fail if not sudo –  TrailRider Jul 28 '12 at 5:43
    
I was logged in as root. But that is a very good tip. Thanks!! –  Amy Jul 28 '12 at 6:55
    
@Amy BTW it is a bad idea to log in as root, it can change the permissions of files if used in your home directory, I believe that there are other issues as well. Using sudo is the preferred way to execute commands that need root privileges as these problems are avoided. –  TrailRider Aug 1 '12 at 23:37
    
@TrailRider Right, apt-get -s ... is a simulation (which will generally succeed when run as a non-root user because it doesn't modify packages on the system). To change what's installed or systemwide information about it with apt-get, you do need to use sudo. –  Eliah Kagan Aug 2 '12 at 1:21

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