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I delete the gbas.so file from my home directory but it keeps coming back. Where does it come from?

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7  
From the terminal run: strings gbas.so , it will dump text strings from the file, it might provide a clue about the source. –  João Pinto Dec 10 '10 at 16:52
    
do you have any programs that use gambas on your system? I recall some program once creating something like this on my system all the time that was written in gambas. –  RolandiXor Jan 16 '11 at 23:00
    
can you past out of the following command 'file gbas.so' where gbas.so is the file. .so are usually c binary file like windows dll's. –  nelaar Mar 29 '11 at 11:51
2  
No Ubuntu package would write a library file on the user's home directory. So, chances are, this is being written by some other binary. But we need more data to find out. (BTW, I ran 'apt-file /gbas.so', and got no hits for Oneiric -- which pretty much means this is not from an Ubuntu Oneiric package.) (1) we need to know what type of file this is. Please run, as neelar asked above, 'file gbas.so' (when you see the file present). Post the result. (2) tell us what version of Ubuntu you are running (you can run 'lsb_release -a' on a terminal). Then, perhaps, we can find more. –  hggdh Oct 11 '11 at 20:16

3 Answers 3

It is related to the safety solution of Banco do Brasil. The java applet downloads these files everytime you access your homebanking.

Source: http://forum.hangarnet.com.br/index.php?s=3a31531547e19169ccd875e5da79ffec&showtopic=111569&view=findpost&p=2446818

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Open up Synaptic package manager and search for this file to see which package does this belongs to.

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1  
The file is being created in the user's home directory, and it is being created dynamically, which means that is not one of the files in a package manifest, which means it will not show up in this kind of search. (Actually, I also know it won't because I've searched for it...but even if it did, there would be no reason to think that the search results would be related to the current situation.) –  Eliah Kagan Nov 13 '11 at 2:49

As mentioned by nelaar, ".so" files are usually shared binary libraries. Try doing "readelf -a gbas.so", it might give you some information about what the file contains (if it really is a library file).

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