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I have the DVD version of 12.04, which I tried to install on my Lenovo machine with a Core i3 processor.

It's working on live mode but when I tried to install to my hard drive it after telling it what partitions to use it fails with a "can't copy file" error. The error also had some number associated with it--I believe it was "error 3" or "error 5" but I don't remember.

I also tried making a bootable pendrive but it shows same error. After this I tried the CD version of 11.10 is install and its successfully done.

Why can't I install from the DVD version?

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Are you sure this is actually happening while partitioning, rather than after partitioning? If the error message really says "cannot copy file," that's most likely to occur while installing (specifically, while copying files from the DVD to already-created partitions on the hard disk).

You haven't given us much information, but most problems copying files while installing are the result of bad installation media. So:

Since you created both DVD media and USB media from the DVD .iso image and got what you believe to be the same error, it's most likely the .iso image itself is what's bad (so the MD5 test will reveal the problem and you can re-download the DVD .iso).

  • If you download a new .iso image, MD5 test it, and find it's corrupted as well, you might try downloading via torrent, since the BitTorrent protocol checks for (and fixes) corruption as it's downloading. You mentioned that you had a similar problem installing at least one other OS (Backtrack). Most other operating systems also have MD5 hashes (or similar) available, and you can check to see if those downloads are corrupted in the same way.

However, if the MD5 test doesn't reveal errors, you should still check the installation media for defects. You may have two separate, defective writes, or a subtle hardware problem in the machine on which you're installing.

If this happens with other .iso images, even if it includes .iso images for other OSes, it's still worth running those tests, as there may be a systematic problem (for example, with your Internet connection) causing you to download corrupted .iso files. There may also be a systematic problem (perhaps with your technique) causing them to be written and/or burned incorrectly.

Depending on the nature of a hardware problem, doing "Check disc for defects" (which applies to USB media as well as actual CD/DVD discs) may fail due to a hardware problem on the computer on which you perform it. That can be good, in that in combination with other information, it can make it possible to diagnose a hardware problem.

It also might be that, due to a problem downloading images, burning/writing them, or a problem with the computer on which you're installing, all installations have a high chance of failure, and that your one installation succeeded more due to luck than due to it being a different ISO image and installation medium.

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@bugsbunny I've expanded my answer above to address this question. –  Eliah Kagan Jul 26 '12 at 17:08
    
Thank u Eliah . MD5 test is usefull and You right its seems in defect in iso image. so than k u very much. and keep helping people like this –  bugsbunny Jul 26 '12 at 17:11
    
@bugsbunny I'm glad I could help. You should redownload the .iso file and MD5 the new image to make sure it's good. If you find you keep downloading corrupted ISO images you might try downloading via torrent, since the BitTorrent protocol checks for (and fixes) corruption as it's downloading. Most other operating systems, including Backtrack, also have MD5 hashes (or similar) available, and you can check to see if those downloads are corrupted in the same way. If you consider this answer to have solved your problem, please accept it by clicking the gray check mark to the left of it. –  Eliah Kagan Jul 26 '12 at 17:14
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