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I was trying to zero my usb from the option Disk Utility but could not happened. Help me out to solve this problem.

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closed as off topic by Web-E, Geppettvs D'Constanzo, Thomas W., jokerdino, fossfreedom Jul 26 '12 at 20:10

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what is zeroing usb?!! –  Web-E Jul 24 '12 at 17:16
1  
Please try one-ing USB instead, that sometimes works. –  izx Jul 24 '12 at 17:20
    
Writing zeros is not a low level format. –  psusi Jul 24 '12 at 18:29
    
Possible duplicate of askubuntu.com/questions/17640/… –  user68186 Jul 24 '12 at 20:39

2 Answers 2

I think I found what you mean.

Create a dummy file named junk.bin on the USB flash drive
Open a terminal and type sudo su
Type fdisk -l and locate the partition you would like to zero out
Type mkdir /tmp/ddusb
Type mount -o loop /dev/sdxx /tmp/ddsdb (replacing sdxxx with your partition)
Type dd if=/dev/zero of=/tmp/ddusb/junk.bin
Type rm /tmp/ddusb/junk.bin

You want to delete all information and make sure it is not recoverable.

Here is the source of the answer: http://www.pendrivelinux.com/permanently-remove-information-from-your-usb-drive/

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Why even mount it and create a file. Just write to the device instead. –  Anonymous Jul 24 '12 at 20:45
2  
dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdxxx –  Anonymous Jul 24 '12 at 20:46

If there are files you need to "hide", I'd recommend shred utility. Its purpose is exactly what you need - replace existing files (or drives) with zeros.

This should help you:

man shred
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shred actually overwrites the file multiple times with patterns to securely erase the data. –  Anonymous Jul 24 '12 at 20:44

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