Sign up ×
Ask Ubuntu is a question and answer site for Ubuntu users and developers. It's 100% free.

I have a machine running Precise (12.04 x64), and I cannot mount my SMB drives. It used to work (a week or two ago) and I didn't touch fstab! The machine hosting the shares is a commercial NAS, and I'm not seeing anything that would indicate it's an issue with the NAS.

I have an older machine which I updated to Precise at the same time (both fresh installed, not dist-upgrade), so should have a very similar configuration. It is not having any problems. I am not having problems on windows machines/partitions either, only one of my Precise machines.

The two machines are using identical entries in fstab and identical /etc/samba/smb.conf files. I don't think I've ever changed smb.conf (has never mattered before).

My fstab entries all basically look like this:

//<share_path>       /media/<share_name>        cifs  credentials=/home/downbeat/.credentials,iocharset=utf8,uid=downbeat,gid=downbeat,file_mode=0644,dir_mode=0755 0 0

Here's the dmesg output on boot:

[   51.162198] CIFS VFS: Error connecting to socket. Aborting operation
[   51.162369] CIFS VFS: cifs_mount failed w/return code = -115
[   51.194106] CIFS VFS: Error connecting to socket. Aborting operation
[   51.194250] CIFS VFS: cifs_mount failed w/return code = -115
[   51.198120] CIFS VFS: Error connecting to socket. Aborting operation
[   51.198243] CIFS VFS: cifs_mount failed w/return code = -115

There are no other errors I see in the dmesg output.

Again, it used to work; now it doesn't. Very similarly configured machine works (but some packages are out of date on the working machine). The NAS has only one interface/IP address, nmblookup works to find it's IP from it's hostname (from the machine with the issue) and it responds to a ping. Please any help would be great.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

I found that switching off IPv6 solved a very similar problem for me. My Ubuntu 12.04 box is hooked up to an enterprise network dominated by Windows users and I don't have any authority over the server. Following the tutorial at solved my problem. (Save a click: Edit /etc/sysctl.conf to insert three lines of the form "net.ipv6.conf.*.disable_ipv6 = 1", replacing * with "all", "lo", and "default"; then give the shell command "sudo sysctl -p".)

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

My internal IP ended up in my NAS's blocklist. I removed it; problem solved. Used smbclient to troubleshoot.

EDIT: I am much more familiar with GNU/Linux these days, and if I were attempting to debug this today, I would check out hosts.deny and iptables, one of which (or both) is likely used to implement the blocklist/blacklist in my now decommissioned commercial NAS.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer


By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.