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I have a dual-monitor system, running Ubuntu 12.10 with Gnome 3 desktop. I want to run a fullscreen wine application on one monitor (I'll call it "secondary"), while another ("primary") will not be affected, and will continue to run regular Gnome desktop.

Image, visually explaining what I want to achieve

I have to use wine virtual desktop (wine explorer /desktop=foo,1680x1050), because otherwise the second monitor gets turned off and application runs on primary one.

However, virtual desktop's window does not occupy the whole sceen because of window decorations. I've removed them from maximized windows using this recipe, but the window is not maximized (although, it's resizable) and can't be maximized using its context menu.

There's no Gnome panel or any other obstacles on the secondary monitor. If I could get rid of decorations I'll achieve exactly what I want.

Is there any way I could either forcibly maximize wine's virtual desktop window, or tell Metacity this window must be not decorated? Or, maybe, there's another approach?

I've obviously tried winecfg's "allow the window manager to decorate/control the windows" options, but they don't seem to affect virtual desktop window. The application can't be run windowed by itself and always goes fullscreen.

Please note, I explicitly don't want to setup monitors as separate X11 displays, each running separate X server.

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1 Answer

There is an easy way to use a windowed mode in Wine:

  1. Start Wine Configuration (winecfg)

  2. Click on the ‘Graphics’ tab

  3. Check ‘Emulate a virtual desktop’

  4. Next to ‘Desktop size’ enter your exact screen resolution.

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