Take the 2-minute tour ×
Ask Ubuntu is a question and answer site for Ubuntu users and developers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
how can i give other drives and partitions short, meaningful names (in nautilus)?

I've got two Windows drives next to the Ubuntu drive, they are called XXXGB Filesystem, where XXX is a size (80 and 329). How can I change their names to Windows and Data. I don't care, they are called strangely in /media folder, although it would be nice to know where can I change it too and how may I disable to show a system drive, that shouldn't be visible at all.

How it is now:

enter image description here

How it should look like:

enter image description here

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Takkat, RolandiXor, Jorge Castro, con-f-use, jokerdino Aug 21 '12 at 7:40

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Command Line:

  • To change the labels of drives use one of these commands:

    sudo e2label /dev/sdc6 Data

    OR

    sudo sudo tune2fs -L Data /dev/sdc6

    Replace /dev/sdc6 with the specific drive you want to label and Data with the desired label.

    Use sudo fdisk -l to find drive names.

    Source

GUI:

  • If you prefer GUI option than you can use Gparted.

    To install Gparted hit Alt+Ctrl+T to open terminal and run following command:

    sudo apt-get install gparted

    Once installed hit Alt+F2, type gparted and hit Enter or search for gparted in Unity Dash and run it from there.

    Make sure the drive you want to label is unmounted, if it's mounted you can unmount it in Gparted, right click on the drive and select unmount.

    To label a drive right click on the drive you want to label and select Label, enter the desired label.

    enter image description here

    Click on the apply button in toolbar. That's it!

    enter image description here

How to hide "SYSTEM" partition in Nautilus:

  1. Create a file: 99-hide-some-disks.rules

  2. Insert the following line to the file: KERNEL=="device name", ENV{UDISKS_PRESENTATION_HIDE}="1",

    Where device name is sdaX or hdX

  3. Copy the file to /etc/udev/rules.d

  4. Reboot computer, now the drive from a file is invisible (you can still mount it by hand only).

    Source: Thanks to Benjamin

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, I suppose, changing partition name is the only option, it must be enough :) Could you add this to the answer, to be complete, cause I found out, how to hide "SYSTEM" partition in Nautilus: 1. Create a file: 99-hide-some-disks.rules 2. Insert the following line to the file: KERNEL=="device name", ENV{UDISKS_PRESENTATION_HIDE}="1", where device name is sdaX or hdX 3. Copy the file to /etc/udev/rules.d 4. Reboot computer, now the drive from a file is invisible (you can still mount it by hand only) Thank you. –  Benjamin Jun 19 '12 at 18:37
    
You can use "Disk Utility" came by default with your Ubuntu installation.(I have used it on Fedora though. So not sure bout the outcome of it.) –  Curious Apprentice Jun 19 '12 at 19:16

If you set the volume label for them in Windows, they should show up with those names in Ubuntu as well. It works for me at least. I have a Win XP partition, and a shared partition for music/movies/etc… both which show up with their assigned volume labels in both Ubuntu and Windows.

So just boot into Windows, right-click on the drives, and set their labels.

share|improve this answer
    
From what I've found out, I have to edit /etc/fstab to change the name of the files in /media/ directory (by editing file or by using pysdm gui application). So it may be a solution of an additional part, but changing partitions name in Windows isn't an option for me so far. And disabling SYSTEM partition from mounting isn't solved yet, so please, if you know any other solution, let me know. –  Benjamin Jun 19 '12 at 17:13

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.