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After upgrading to 12.04, I'm trying to setup gitslave. This worked on 11.10 with version gitslave 2.0.1 (FYI: I tested 2.0.1 on 12.04...same result).

$ tar xvzf gitslave-2.0.2.tar.gz

gitslave-2.0.2/
gitslave-2.0.2/web/
gitslave-2.0.2/web/index.html
gitslave-2.0.2/web/Makefile
gitslave-2.0.2/web/ReleaseNotes.txt
gitslave-2.0.2/web/tutorial.css
gitslave-2.0.2/web/tutorial-basic.html
gitslave-2.0.2/prep_gitscheck
gitslave-2.0.2/gits
gitslave-2.0.2/Makefile
gitslave-2.0.2/ReleaseNotes
gitslave-2.0.2/README
gitslave-2.0.2/contrib/
gitslave-2.0.2/contrib/gitslave.spec.in
gitslave-2.0.2/contrib/Makefile
gitslave-2.0.2/contrib/gitslave.spec
gitslave-2.0.2/contrib/.gitignore
gitslave-2.0.2/contrib/gitin
gitslave-2.0.2/contrib/gits-checkup
gitslave-2.0.2/.gitignore
gitslave-2.0.2/BugsTodo
gitslave-2.0.2/LICENSE.README
gitslave-2.0.2/LICENSE.TXT

$ cd gitslave-2.0.2

$ make

make -C web
make[1]: Entering directory `/home/tim/Desktop/gitslave-2.0.2/web'
make[1]: `gits-man-page.html' is up to date.
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/tim/Desktop/gitslave-2.0.2/web'
make -C contrib
make[1]: Entering directory `/home/tim/Desktop/gitslave-2.0.2/contrib'
make[1]: Nothing to be done for `all'.
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/tim/Desktop/gitslave-2.0.2/contrib'

$ sudo make install -C contrib

make: Entering directory `/home/tim/Desktop/gitslave-2.0.2/contrib'
mkdir -p //usr/local/share/man/man1 //usr/local/bin
install -m 444 gits-checkup.1 //usr/local/share/man/man1
install -m 444 gitin.1 //usr/local/share/man/man1
install -m 444 gitin.1 //usr/local/share/man/man1/gitout.1
install -m 755 gits-checkup //usr/local/bin
install -m 755 gitin //usr/local/bin/
install -m 755 gitin //usr/local/bin/gitout
make: Leaving directory `/home/tim/Desktop/gitslave-2.0.2/contrib'

$ gits

No command 'gits' found, did you mean:
 Command 'gitps' from package 'gnuit' (universe)
 Command 'giws' from package 'giws' (universe)
 Command 'gitg' from package 'gitg' (universe)
 Command 'gitk' from package 'gitk' (main)
 Command 'gist' from package 'yorick' (universe)
 Command 'git' from package 'git' (main)
gits: command not found

What am I doing wrong?

UPDATE:

The gits file doesn't seem to be installed into the right directory

$ sudo find / -name 'gits'

/home/tim/Desktop/gitslave-2.0.2/gits

~/Desktop/gitslave-2.0.2$ ./gits

Usage: gits [-p|--parallel COUNT] [-v|--verbose]+ [--quiet] [--rawout] [--help] [--version]
    [-n|--no-pager] [--paginate] [--eval-args] [--exclude SLAVE-REGEXP]
    [--keep-going] [--no-commit] [--no-hide] [--no-progress]

UPDATE

Embarrassed and annoyed....all it required was a reboot. It suddenly worked this morning, after a good night's sleep.

echo $PATH; ls -l /usr/local/bin

/usr/lib/lightdm/lightdm:/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin:/sbin:/bin:/usr/games

total 132
-rwxr-xr-x 1 root root   2914 Jun 18 15:58 gitin
-rwxr-xr-x 1 root root   2914 Jun 18 15:58 gitout
-rwxr-xr-x 1 root root 120109 Jun 18 15:59 gits
-rwxr-xr-x 1 root root   3331 Jun 18 15:58 gits-checkup

Am I going have to reboot everytime install something to /usr/local/bin? (FYI: had this same issue with node-less this morning...it required another reboot to work)

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You don't seemed to have run sudo make install or if you did you did not paste that output above.

If you believe you have done so, please update your question with that paste and also include the output of echo $PATH; ls -l /usr/local/bin

If you did not do so, what was the documentation failure which led you to try -C contrib?

Thanks

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Thanks for responding...it looks like it's an issue with Ubuntu's install (see 2nd update above). A quick thanks for coding gits...really useful tool. –  timborden Jun 19 '12 at 12:01
1  
@timborden: Thanks. You should not need to reboot after installation in /usr/local/bin. The one time I can particularly think of that weird things happen is during shell program caching, but that is typically only caused by adding a program earlier in your path when it was already known to be in a specific location (I don't believe it caches misses). You can try hash -r to see if that will help. –  Seth Robertson Jun 20 '12 at 1:49
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