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I am a perfect noob here in the Linux world. Previously was using Windows 7.

Mine is an HP laptop - Intel core2duo T5470 @ 1.60GHz × 2 / 965GM with 2GB RAM. I installed Ubuntu 12.04TLS and is quite liking it's display. I really recognized it is 3D before knowing it was Unity 3D interface. My uses are image editing, home uses, downloads, browsing etc.. No video-editing/gaming at all. Being a Photography enthusiast I use image editing programs fairly more.

But I am now feeling my laptop is getting a bit overheated - processor and hard-disk. I tried lm-sensor and could not make out much of it. Installed Xsensors.7. It gives the same output as lm-sensors gave me. It gives temperature for 4 things> Temp1, temp2, temp3, and temp4. For "acpitz". Please guide me in this.

However I wanted to ask something more. Which one is better for working with images - photography I mean - openSUSE 12.1 or Ubuntu with unity 3D? Can I get the display quality with the openSUSE distribution? I heard for laptops openSUSE uses power more efficiently, is there any truth? Please suggest me whether I should try openSUSE or not. If so with which GUI? KDE or GNOME? Thanks in advance.
Regards
SoT

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Hi SoT I recommend that you should use unity 2d which is available from the log on screen. You can also use Xubuntu. Or you can use Lubuntu as it is extremely light. And yeah one more thing you should note that Ubuntu 12.04 LTS has improved its power consumption. Release notes here for your info : wiki.ubuntu.com/PrecisePangolin/ReleaseNotes –  Ravi Jun 17 '12 at 14:29
    
Thank you Ravi. I will try that. :) –  SoT Jun 17 '12 at 14:51

2 Answers 2

You won't find much difference between Ubuntu and OpenSuse other than the looks and feels, but functionality should be about the same.

The software you need to edit images (Gimp,Inkscape, etc...) will run in both systems flawlessly.

The overheating problem...some laptops models have been reported to suffer from overheating issues under linux (Ubuntu or OpenSuse). It might just be worth performing a google search for your model in particular.

I personally prefer Ubuntu over Opensuse, but both are solid distributions and you will do just fine with either one.

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Thanks for the reply leousa. :) I wanted to know specifically about the looks and feels. Which will reveal more color/coontrast/detail/texture in still images ? I am okay with functionality.. –  SoT Jun 17 '12 at 14:29
    
In my opinion that will depend more on your computer monitor than anything else. High contrast, resolution, bright...that is not so much dependent on the OS (Ubuntu, Opensuse) but on the hardware specifications of your monitor. In that regard your choice of OS is not critical. –  leousa Jun 17 '12 at 14:38
    
Hmm.. I felt a considerable change in quality when I moved from Windows 7 to Ubuntu... Mine is laptop with Intel 965GM integrated graphics card.. –  SoT Jun 17 '12 at 14:49

Welcome to AskUbuntu.com!

I would recommend using Ubuntu.GNOMEorKDE` is matter of person preference. Try both, and see which one you like.

Regarding Photography, much more will depend on your graphic card , processor and memory.

We have Photoshop alternative called GNU GIMP and Adobe Illustrator alternative called Inkscape

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Thank you BigGenius. Could yuu please help me more? I am haveing an ingtegrated graphics card on my Intel 965GM chipset. Will I get the 3D effect in openSUSE also? ( Or am I way off the mark - that Unity 3d has nothing to do with 3D?? ) –  SoT Jun 17 '12 at 13:45
    
Unity 3d is 3d. And yes you should get 3d effect in openSUSE as well. Install it and then update your system. You will get what you want. –  BigSack Jun 17 '12 at 13:48

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