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I fell in love with ubuntu when 10.10 was released. I want to stick to it, since I like it a lot more than the 11 and 12 series.

My question is, since its not currently supported, what problems will I face?

  1. Will I be eligible for update? I mean atleast till the time it was supported
  2. Can I somehow get security updates and patches
  3. Will the latest software available still run on ubuntu 10.10
  4. I don't care much about drivers, as much as I care about python, php, apache, wine and other softwares.
  5. Will the software center work, and will there be updates?
  6. What issues am I most prone to face?
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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It would be better if you installed Ubuntu 10.04 because Canonical will support it with updates until April 2013. I myself hated Ubuntu 11.10 because of its glitches, but then i did a fresh install with 12.04 and I'm loving it so far.

Installing anything older then 10.04 is completely unnecessary because there is no support along with it. Also if you are a person who likes old versions so much and you wont mind using Ubuntu server edition, you can try Ubuntu 8.04 Server Edition. It will also be supported by Canonical until April 2013. Make your choice, and good luck.

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I guess fresh install will do the trick, because till now I was installing it through windows Wubi installer –  Kartik Anand Jun 15 '12 at 19:45
    
Either use 10.4 (not 10.10) until April, or just go the easy way and try to get use to 12.4 –  Nick Bailuc Jun 15 '12 at 19:52
    
Also Linux version 3.2.0-26-generic-pae just came out and Ubuntu 12.4 is compatible with it. –  Nick Bailuc Jun 15 '12 at 19:56
    
dont use wubi installer, its full of bugs –  Nick Bailuc Jun 16 '12 at 13:39

Ubuntu 10.10 is already End-of-Life, meaning there will be no more security or other updates for it.

Also, newer versions of software won't necessarily run on 10.10 easily, no. Most will require newer underlying core libraries.

Is there any particular reason to not install 12.04? It was just released a couple months ago, and will be supported until April 2017.

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Its kind of bulky, I mean seriously bulky(Windows 7 is faster on my laptop than ubuntu), and also the "classic Gnome Shell". –  Kartik Anand Jun 15 '12 at 19:39

Answers by number:

  1. Yes, you can update to the latest updates made before it went EOL, but it's a hassle to do as you need to switch to the old-releases repository.
  2. No, security updates are not going to be released even though there are known security vulnerabilities
  3. No, newer software will require newer libraries, and new software won't be packaged for EOL releases.
  4. You may not care about drivers, but they won't be updated. And neither will any of the software you listed, so still not looking great.
  5. Software Center might technically work (after changing repositories manually), but updates won't as no updates are being provided.
  6. All of the issues mentioned above, and the fact that most people aren't willing to support EOL releases, so when you run into any problem don't expect to get support for fixing it from here or most other support venues.

Based on all that, I'd say that the answer to your main question, "Is installing Ubuntu 10.10 still a viable option?" is a resounding NO.

Based on some of your comments here, it sounds like you may be happier with the 12.04 releases of Xubuntu, which uses a more GNOME2 like UI and has a less resource intensive DE than Ubuntu, or Lubuntu, which doesn't have a very GNOME2 like UI, but will be blazing fast (at least when using the applications which come with it) on even decade old hardware. Both Xubuntu and Lubuntu use the same repositories as Ubuntu, the only difference is the set of applications installed by default. So you can still use Ubuntu Software Center and install any software you want.

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I really liked Ubuntu 10.10 as well - it was the first Linux distribution I installed. However, we all know, changes began with the following version hence I changed to Debian. I really like it. I am still getting used to it.. . recently I learned the following which is AMAZING :

International Space Station adopts Debian Linux, drops Windows & Red Hat into airlock

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I understand what you mean when you say that 11 and 12 went the wrong way. I once tried switching back to 10.10, however, I had to look for another distro for the following reasons:

  • Not possible to update anymore (it seemed as if I couldn't even get the updates for the 10.10 version)
  • New programs will not necessarily work as some of them may need certain library versions, while the existing ones are out-of-date.
  • It's much more worthwhile to return to 10.04 for the time being. As long as you want to keep away from the newer 11 and 12 Ubuntus (avoiding bloat is always a good idea), the LTS Lucid Lynx will serve your needs well for a year or so.

If you wish to stick to a stable distro, I recommend choosing something of a more lightweight nature, such as some debian-based distro. I myself am using Crunchbang and I can easily recommend it to anyone - the current stable release doesn't really differ at all from the testing branch (yes, it's a debian-based linux) in terms of appearance and performance (around 80 MB of RAM used on startup), therefore it is easy to notice that this is much more stable - unlike mainstream Linux distributions, such as Ubuntu, which are always trying to catch up with the trends.

Crunchbang is just an example, you may wish to review the lightweight versions of Linux Mint (namely LXDE desktop) or others which also give you a choice of a more resource-hungry desktop. Recommendation: stick to lightweight window managers as they are stable, do not consume much resources (if any at all given today's computers' specs) and, if configured right, look rather elegant with minimal compositing and a nice GTK skin (that is why I use crunchbang, it has a default selection of great themes).

To add to 10.10, it's kernel version is a bit dated and you would probably want either the latest 2.6 release or the 3.x kernel (10.10, as far as I remember, uses the older 2.6 release).

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Ubuntu is just a platform for me to learn Linux shell and programming, while being able to perform all other common tasks easily. I don't mind switching to another distro if it's software center is comparable to Ubuntu –  Kartik Anand Jun 15 '12 at 19:56
    
There are many Ubuntu based distros which utilise the same package system, thus you should really spend some time researching other approaches. Ubuntu has really become bloated lately and for programming you should try something of a less streamline nature. By the way, why was my answer downvoted twice? –  user1020567 Jun 15 '12 at 19:58

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