Take the 2-minute tour ×
Ask Ubuntu is a question and answer site for Ubuntu users and developers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a 500 GB hard disk and I intend to dual boot it with Windows and Ubuntu. I want to reserve about 150 GB for Windows and the rest of the 350 GB for Ubuntu.

1) Is the entire 350 GB is going to get used for file system?

2) Can I create partitions in Linux like it can be done in Windows? Eg: C: D: etc..

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

Yes you can do that. Create an extended partition and then logicals within that.

They won't be called d, e, f etc though.

When you install you do so to the / mountpoint, if you only want to have a 16Gb (for example) system partition then do so.

You can then create your other partitions and get them to be mounted within the system using fstab.

If you want to share data between linux and windows - have an ntfs partition.

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/HowtoPartition

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Fstab

share|improve this answer
add comment

Well,

Firstly the Linux directory structure does not work like windows.

There are NO drives by default.The OS and the other things all come under one directory-ROOT represented by "/ "

Here is how the Linux Directory Structure is-

enter image description here

The /Home is similar to your My Documents+My Computer

Well,Though the structure is not Drive-based,like windows,you can create partitions(drives) similar to windows(But they wont be named C: or D:...You may label them as seen in the screenshot below or they will be named New Volume1/2/3etc).They are treated as an external media(somewhat like a usb).In linux,anything other than the what is under "/ " by default is an outsider(and so are the partitions/drives).

Here is how the drives will look if you hve them-

enter image description here

The Devices part you see in the upper left corner are the drives(the Eject arrow shows how they are treated or considered as external devices).

While what you see in the remaining browser is the /Home" directory.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.