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I have a generic pair of smartphone earphones that have the button (along with a microphone) and I would like to use the button as a pause/play key in Ubuntu, like I would on an Android phones music player.

Is there a way to enable this headset control in Ubuntu?

If the headset controls are a hardware feature of audio jacks used in Android phones, the name of that hardware (audio jack) would be appreciated.

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

Traditional stereo headphones have only three leads, while ones with a microphone and/or the "button" have four. In order for the microphone or the button to work on your machine, the headphone jack must also have four leads (which is unlikely) and the drivers you're using must also support the fourth lead.

It is unlikely that the manufacturer would provide hardware without driver support, so if you still have the manufacturer-provided OS installed, you could boot into that and test the button there. If it works there but not in Ubuntu, then it's probably a lack of driver support.

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It's 2016 and many laptops have combined TRRS jacks like smartphones do (three out of three recent laptops in my family). I think this answer might not necessarily be still relevant. – Ivan Anishchuk Jun 21 at 19:59

Sorry to say this. Same kind of socket is there and it depends on the architecture of operating system and has patent rights that are not open to all except Apple. Follow this conversation headset button reactions. Iam not allowed to link more than two items so here is the detailed description of how i converted my laptop's two TRS sockets to a TRRS socket.

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