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I have an old computer that can't handle a boot stick install, so i have to create an actual, old fashioned boot CD.

However, the image size for Ubuntu 12.04 is 732MB, which is too large for a CD, which can hold only 700MB.

The maintainers of Ubuntu 12.04 say the image size will never go over 700MB, and indeed, the download size seemed to be 689MB.

Brasero says it won't burn the CD because the file is too big, what's going on?

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command line command dd can be used to burn an ISO (sudo dd if=/dev/cdrom of=/dir/to/file.iso) –  Rinzwind Aug 14 '12 at 19:17
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The issue could possibly be because of the differing definitions of MB. Even if it's not, you should be aware of it to save you headaches later on. –  Flimm Nov 30 '12 at 13:07

11 Answers 11

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I use K3B to burn ISO images. For me, is better then brasero.

Try to burn with another CD brand (Preferably do not use CD-RW )

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I've had the same issue and with another CD brand solved my issue! (verbatim worked) –  Zuul May 16 '12 at 2:49
    
i used k3b, and it worked. (brasero was unable to use any of my three different brands of cd-r.) hm - how do i mark this thread as solved? –  memius May 16 '12 at 11:22
    
Find closed to my answer a tick, that must be pressed. –  Subv3rsion May 16 '12 at 11:29
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@memius, If this answer solve the issue, mark it as the accepted answer by clicking on the check box outline to the left of the answer. see here how –  Zuul May 16 '12 at 13:33
    
TDK works for me. –  hexafraction Aug 3 '12 at 20:18

Are you using a 74 minute CD-R? You need to use an 80 minute one.

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If you dig deeper, you'll stumble upon this particular URL which has the "CD" images.

All images are <= 700MB and created specifically for "CD"s unlike the official download link which is actually meant to be burned on a DVD. Hope this helps if anyone is still looking for answers to this question.

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Try downloading it from the alternative link at the Ubuntu website (the torrent one). It's about 695MB (AMD64), and the Intel one is 687MB.

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If you're trying to install Ubuntu 12.10 (Quantal Quetzal), it is too big for CD now, so you need to use USB or DVD install options.

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The compressed CDs website has a unique compression method, unlike any other solution shown here. The superior compression method fits all of a 12.04 or 13.10 distro onto a CD, not a truncated distro, but the complete real deal.

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702mb and 732mb is still to big for a cd right, and i'm not sure about the installation to be compatible with dvd r, the simple choices are to install it on a flash drive/USB or buy a cd brand with more than 700mb such as verbatim

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A standard CD has 703 MB. They are marketed as 700 MB for marketing reasons. Having a round number is better, but they can fit around 703 MB, as I said. However, it is not advised to fill a CD completely as the last sectors might not be in a particularly good condition. –  Martin Oscar Caballero Dec 1 '12 at 2:53

You have to follow the instructions to create an image of Ubuntu from any Ubuntu version. This is not the traditional way to burn CDs. It is different because the size of Ubuntu 12.04 is more than 700 Mb, so you must follow the instructions which are on this page.

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There are options for people in this situation.

  • A "700MB" CD would be a good start. They can fit 737MB on (because the advertised number is actually a MiB) and even then there's often some overburn space. I've got to over 750MB on a 700MB disk before but that does larely

  • Use USB instead of CD. A 1GB USB stick would be cheap and offer a reusable method for loading images.

  • Failing that there are smaller images (like Server, Minimal, etc) which you can install in text mode and then install the ubuntu-desktop metapackage.

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ImgBurn will overburn this file. It's free software, very easy to use. From personal experience, I have burned 12.04 to a 700MB Memorex CD-R. This was a 741,646,232 byte file, which is 707.289 MB. It does work, even with the low quality Memorex stuff, though maybe not the first time. But that's a Memorex thing.

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Welcome to Ask Ubuntu! Can you include a answer with instructions on how to do that? Leaving a half-answer as a comment can often cause more harm than good. Thanks. –  Danatela Jan 9 at 3:41
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@Danatela You have that meta post backwards. It's comments like this that are considered especially bad (and which that meta post cautions against making), not answers. While this answer ought to be expanded, it is much better that it is posted as an answer than as a comment. –  Eliah Kagan Jan 9 at 6:03

Brasero (on Debian and Ubuntu), has varying levels of reliability because of its depending (via brasero-cdrkit) on the controversial wodim (which is a fork of cdrtools). According to the original author of cdrtools, the wodim fork is badly broken and unmaintained BUT shipped by default in Debian/Ubuntu. See one-sided and detailed account of the controversy. So if Brasero fails for you, it might be because of this.

To work around the issue, you may use a lightweight alternative like Xfburn. Xfburn relies on the non-controversial libburnia libraries, so is not plagued by the same issues as Brasero.

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Either way, I expanded the answer proposing an explanation for the Brasero failure. –  landroni Feb 4 at 16:04
    
Cool that's even better! I personally don't consider the accepted answer an "answer" since the question specifically asks what is going on.. but whatever. comment removed –  Seth Feb 4 at 17:35

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