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Hello I had some freezes with my desktop. It is Lucid 10.04 on a Lenovo 3000 N200. System freezes completely.

How can I locate the problem?

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can you install hardinfo (hardinfo.berlios.de/HomePage) from software center and paste a report here? –  RolandiXor Nov 17 '10 at 20:32
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Can you still use a magic sysrq key (like Alt + Print + K to restart X? Another good start is ~/xsession.errors and dmesg / /var/log/messages. –  Bobby Nov 17 '10 at 21:55
    
In 95% cases that linux freezes its a hardware problem, of course if you didn't mess with the system. Check the temperature of you CPU, GPU, system and if all fans are getting air. Also try to find out the usage pattern that causes freeze and check /var/log/messages and system status with dmesg –  danizmax Nov 17 '10 at 22:09
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When it freezes, hit caps lock and num-lock and see if the keyboard lights change. If so, then X has frozen rather than the hardware. –  charlie-tca Nov 19 '10 at 23:52
    
@Roland Taylor. What should I paste here exactly? Devices, Memory, Filesystem? –  vrcmr Nov 21 '10 at 15:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Sometimes it's just the X server that is frozen. Try to get a console by hitting CTRL-ALT-F1. If that won't do, try logging it your machine using SSH (install openssh-server package first). If you can't get a shell, reboot.

Once you have a shell, check the system logs (/var/log/syslog, /var/log/messages, /var/log/Xorg.0.log and ~/.xsession-errors). Scroll up to the time the crash happened. If you didn't have to reboot, the dmesg command will show you the kernel log buffer in case it can't write to your filesystem.

Whether or not you are able to find anything in the log file, what makes it easier to debug is being able to reproduce the problem at will. If you can't, and the logs show nothing unusual, then you can try to isolate the source of the problem by booting a rescue CD (or a completely different OS), removing non-essential pieces of hardware, or replacing some parts with others that are known to be functionnal. Doing this can be tedious, and requires rigour.

Once you have minimal information, file a bug report for the suspected faulty software, unless you think your hardware is faulty.

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