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I have trouble finding the package for this software. I built and installed from the packages found here, but it's still not working properly with rvm and gem (log is located here). How would you suggest finding a package for this to work properly?

stanley@ubuntu:~/Github/webdev_class/ruby$ sudo apt-cache search ^openssl
[sudo] password for stanley: 
openssl-blacklist - Blacklists for  OpenSSL RSA keys and tools
openssl-blacklist-extra - Non-default blacklists of OpenSSL RSA keys
libengine-pkcs11-openssl - OpenSSL engine for PKCS#11 modules
libxmlsec1-openssl - Openssl engine for the XML security library
openssl - Secure Socket Layer (SSL) binary and related cryptographic tools

Here is the printout after trying dpkg -l | grep openssl.

stanley@ubuntu:~/Github/webdev_class/ruby$ dpkg -l | grep openssl
ii  openssl                                1.0.0e-2ubuntu4.5                       Secure Socket Layer (SSL) binary and related cryptographic tools
ii  python-openssl                         0.12-1ubuntu1                           Python wrapper around the OpenSSL library
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Use dpkg -l | grep openssl to see if you've got a version of openssl the package manager knows about. –  belacqua May 12 '12 at 21:31
    
See my edits. Now trying with more suggestions. –  stanigator May 12 '12 at 21:33
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3 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Use sudo apt-get install openssl, or use the software center to find it.

Install via the software center

When I look for packages, I generally use apt-cache search whatever.
For openssl, here's what I see on my system:

$ apt-cache search ^openssl
openssl - Secure Socket Layer (SSL) binary and related cryptographic tools
openssl-blacklist - Blacklists for  OpenSSL RSA keys and tools
openssl-blacklist-extra - Non-default blacklists of OpenSSL RSA keys
libengine-pkcs11-openssl - OpenSSL engine for PKCS#11 modules
libxmlsec1-openssl - Openssl engine for the XML security library

For gem dependencies, you would normally use something like :

sudo apt-get install ruby-full build-essential ruby-rvm yorick rubygems

However, apparently ruby-rvm is broken, so the ex(?)-maintainer's advice is to remove it completely, and install via the provided URL and bash script:


sudo apt-get --purge remove ruby-rvm
sudo rm -rf /usr/share/ruby-rvm /etc/rvmrc /etc/profile.d/rvm.sh

open new terminal and validate environment is clean from old rvm settings (should be no output):

env | grep rvm

if there was output, try to open new terminal, if it does not help - restart computer

install RVM:

curl -L get.rvm.io | bash -s stable

do not forget to read rvm requirements before installing rubies


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I've updated my question with your suggestions. –  stanigator May 12 '12 at 20:57
    
Ah, see the command I actually ran -- use the ^ in ^openssl to trim the output. I don't believe you need sudo for apt-cache (I never do) -- might save you a few keystrokes per year. I'll update my answer shortly -- waiting to see if this is getting you closer. –  belacqua May 12 '12 at 20:59
    
Thanks for pointing out my mistakes. I've updated the log in my question. –  stanigator May 12 '12 at 21:15
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OpenSSL is usually installed by default on Ubuntu. You can look up, why it is installed with:

$ aptitiude why package

For openssl this can be retraced to cups:

$ LANG=C aptitude why openssl
i   ssl-cert Depends openssl (>= 0.9.8g-9)
$ LANG=C aptitude why ssl-cert
i   cups Depends ssl-cert (>= 1.0.11)

(i used the LANG environment variable to get english output, not my local one).

I'm not sure but maybe rvm / gem do require the SSL development libraries, which are packaged into libssl-devInstall libssl-dev.

$ sudo apt-get install libssl-dev

This is usually the case when you compile something from source, what gem as I remember does, when resolving package dependencies.

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Is aptitude a package manager? –  stanigator May 12 '12 at 21:17
    
yes, see "apt-get show aptitude" for a description. –  mweinelt May 12 '12 at 21:19
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You should get the followings:

sudo apt-get install openssl
sudo apt-get install libssl-dev
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