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I have install p7zip-full and p7zip-rar packages to help me in this situation, but default archive of Ubuntu file-roller can not open "Windows 7 theme pack" files, which uses .themepack extensions. How can I open this type of file or is there any known method to do that in Ubuntu. In Windows "7zip" program can open this kind of file easily. I am using Ubuntu 11.10

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For anyone interested, after finding that solution, here you can download a lot of "themepack": windows.microsoft.com/it-it/windows/themes –  Pisu Jul 8 '13 at 5:36
    
The same question (and answer) is also for .deskthemepack extension (theme pack for Windows 8 / RT) –  Pisu Jul 11 '13 at 21:09
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

After trying several hours and links, I think, I've finally got the right solution, that allow me to open a .themepack file with file-roller.

  1. First install cabextract package, by entering the command on terminal.
    • Press super+a key on Unity, type terminal on dash and click on the terminal icon.
    • Type sudo apt-get install cabextract command on the terminal, provide your password and hit enter.
  2. Then type again in the terminal sudo apt-get install assogiate, this will install the assogiate program on computer. (alternatively, you can install it through "Software Center".

  3. Then open the assogiate program, by pressing alt+f2 and typing assogiate on the 'Run a command' box.

    • This will open assogiate program in graphical window. On the left hand side pane, click on Search Results. then type cab on the bottom text box on the right pane.
    • Double Click on the desired application name. ( In this case, it is vnd.ms-cab-compressed ).
    • On the new Edit type application/vnd.ms-cab-compressed window, Click on Filenames tab. Then click on Add button, type *.themepack on the new Add filename rule dialog window. Click close, and then Exit the program.

Now you should open any *.themepack extensions file with file-roller just like any other compressed tar, zip etc files.

If you want this settings persists globally (system wide), you should open the program in the step 2 as gksu assogiate, all other procedure is same.

Credit goes to MistreLion, answerer of this post.


Update

I recently upgraded my Ubuntu to 12.04 and in this version, you need only to install p7zip-full package.

Open a terminal, type the following command , provide password and hit enter. That's the all required (of course, after connecting to the internet).

sudo apt-get install p7zip-full

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I am still not fully satisfied with this answer, 'cause it is done all within a program. I should be able to do this manually –  Anwar Shah May 10 '12 at 11:37
    
What do you mean by "manually"? –  Eliah Kagan May 10 '12 at 13:41
    
@EliahKagan, meaning doing it without the needs for any software. I am trying to do something with the files in /usr/share/mime/packages/*,trying to invent some method eliminating the needs of downloading the extra software. Can you help me in this (mime type, file types etc). –  Anwar Shah May 10 '12 at 13:58
    
Wow, very interesting. I did not know that file-rollers looked at declared mime type for the extension. –  Pisu Jul 8 '13 at 5:38
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A .themepack file for Windows 7 is actually a CAB archive (like a .cab file). You can open such a file with cabextract. To get it, install the cabextract package.

Then either run cabextract name.themepack (replacing name with the name of the theme pack filename before the .themepack extension), or configure the Archive Manager to open .cab files and open it graphically from Nautilus.

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The command line method worked for me.But I want it to be done graphically and your provided method(link) not working for me, since I am using Ubuntu 11.10. –  Anwar Shah May 9 '12 at 17:14
    
Good point. Nautilus in recent versions of Ubuntu doesn't make it easy to open files with unknown extensions, with the application of your choice. I'm not sure what the best way is to specify the application to open .themepack files, but this method should still work. –  Eliah Kagan May 9 '12 at 17:55
    
Thanks for your prompt reply, but that link doesn't help me. But I myself find a solution. –  Anwar Shah May 10 '12 at 11:38
    
I don't understand, why downvote on this question ?. May be some guys built a habit of downvoting every post with title containing 'Windows'. I think, I should change the title of the question now. –  Anwar Shah May 10 '12 at 11:40
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@AnwarShah I'm curious as to what happened when you tried to use Thunar to associate .themepack files with file-roller. Or does Thunar not currently provide that degree of configurability? In any case, I'm glad you were able to find the answer. As for the downvote, who knows why someone downvoted your question (I upvoted it), maybe by accident, it would've been nice if they'd left a comment, but random upvotes cancel out random downvotes in the long run (more than cancel out for your reputation points, since upvotes count more than downvotes). –  Eliah Kagan May 10 '12 at 13:40
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If you change the .themepack extension to .lzx, the preinstalled Archive Manager can extract if just fine. (Thanks to 7zip for dispaying the compression type in its file list.)

However, MistreLion's solution would avoid the annoyance of renaming a file each time. (I simply prefer not to install additional software on my system if I don't need to.)

If there's a way to make Archive Manager aware that the .themepack extension is actually .lzx, it would be a far more elegant approach.

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Thanks. I've solved the problem already and in the recent Ubuntu versions i only need to install p7zip package –  Anwar Shah Oct 25 '12 at 4:40
    
Cool, just wanted to put in my 2 cents. BTW, today with the release of Windows 8, M$ seems to have changed the format to .deskthemepack files, and these appear to extract natively in Ubuntu. –  Michael bean Oct 27 '12 at 4:00
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