Take the 2-minute tour ×
Ask Ubuntu is a question and answer site for Ubuntu users and developers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've recently started using ubuntu 12.04 LTS 32bit on my computer, the graphics card of which is an old Ati Radeon x800 pro. I tried to install its video driver provided my amd which I downloaded from this link: http://support.amd.com/us/gpudownloa...2&lang=English

That's exactly the error which appeared in console: Code:

ATI Technologies Linux Driver Installer/Packager 
==================================================

Error: ./default_policy.sh does not support version
default:v2:i686:lib::none:3.2.0-24-generic-pae; make sure that the version is being
correctly set by --iscurrentdistro

After googling the error I figured out that the version of ubuntu I have does not support this version of the driver, despite the fact that it is provided by AMD for linux x86! I am not sure about the above conclusion of mine, so I would like to hear your opinion before I go searching for open source drivers {If you have any suggestions please go on}.

In case you need to know the way I tried to install the driver using the .run file, i did the following:

  1. Changed the file permissions to allow the file to be run as a program.
  2. In console, while being in the directory where the file was {Downloads} I typed sudo ./ati-driver-installer-9-3-x86.x86_64.run
share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

Please use the proprietary drivers provided by Ubuntu's driver installer. If there are none, probably because that card is rather old and I remember reading that support for this series has been dropped some time ago, then remove possibly installed drivers and packages. Ubuntu should then default back to the open source drivers.

That 9-3 in the filename means that this driver is from march 2009. Installing such an old driver will not work.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.