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I've been looking into using the Ubuntu typeface for a logo. The logo is for a web site unrelated to ubuntu and open source software. I'm wondering whether the license allows this, and if so, whether there are any limitations?

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up vote 10 down vote accepted

On the Ubuntu font site, there is this file. And you can read in the Preamble:

This licence allows the licensed fonts to be used, studied, modified and redistributed freely. The fonts, including any derivative works, can be bundled, embedded, and redistributed provided the terms of this licence are met. The fonts and derivatives, however, cannot be released under any other licence. The requirement for fonts to remain under this licence does not require any document created using the fonts or their derivatives to be published under this licence, as long as the primary purpose of the document is not to be a vehicle for the distribution of the fonts.

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5  
Thanks! I think the pertinent point is the clarification that comes immediately after that: "The fonts and derivatives, however, cannot be released under any other licence. The requirement for fonts to remain under this licence does not require any document created using the fonts or their derivatives to be published under this licence, as long as the primary purpose of the document is not to be a vehicle for the distribution of the fonts." – Rog Nov 14 '10 at 7:06
    
It seams clear enough but, in other words It means that: 1) the fonts and its derivatives must be released under Ubuntu Font License, and 2) I'm not required to publish my essay written using those fonts under Ubuntu Font License, "as long as the primary purpose of the document is not to be a vehicle for the distribution of the fonts". – zuzust Nov 14 '10 at 9:48
    
And "as long as the primary purpose of the document is not to be a vehicle for the distribution of the fonts" means that you are not allowed to make a PDF that contains all the characters in the font you want, release it under a different license, then extract the characters to create a "new" font under that different license (or in more simple words: don't try to cheat). – JanC Nov 14 '10 at 17:38

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