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I am connected to the LAN and the wireless. The LAN allots an IP of the form 10.x.x.x while the wireless allots and IP of the form 192.168.x.x.

I can not change the IP of the LAN as it is a managed LAN. There are 10 PCs using the managed LAN. I have set up the printer on a wireless router. The printer is connected wirelessly to the wireless router.

My problem - Every time I have to print, I have to disconnect from the LAN and then issue a print over the wireless. Then re-connect the LAN cable once the printing is done. It is a little annoying.

I am sure I am doing something silly, but I cant figure out what. Is it possible to route the print commands through the wireless and have the LAN for my regular internet connectivity?

EDIT - Output of route -n:

Kernel IP routing table
Destination     Gateway         Genmask         Flags Metric Ref    Use Iface
0.0.0.0         10.33.11.1      0.0.0.0         UG    0      0        0 eth0
10.33.11.0      0.0.0.0         255.255.255.0   U     1      0        0 eth0
169.254.0.0     0.0.0.0         255.255.0.0     U     1000   0        0 eth0
192.168.1.0     0.0.0.0         255.255.255.0   U     2      0        0 wlan0
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Can you post the output of route -n? –  Jan May 3 '12 at 12:10
    
@Jan I have added the output of route -n –  pravin May 3 '12 at 12:58
    
This question appears to be abandoned and unanswered, could you perhaps add more detail to your question? If this question no longer applies then you can either delete it or answer it yourself if you've solved the problem. This is to help with the Ask Ubuntu Clean Up. If you feel this question is not abandoned, please flag the question explaining that. :) –  Seth Jan 12 '13 at 2:29
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closed as too localized by fossfreedom Jan 12 '13 at 8:19

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2 Answers

Blind shot, down-vote if I'm wrong.

It looks like your printer has an IP like 192.168.x.y where x<>1.

As your router table for 192.168.1.0 has a netmask of 255.255.255.0, it will never be routed to wlan0, instead it will use the default gateway. Only addresses starting by 192.168.1.x will match this rule.

You have two options, get the printer IP in the 192.168.1.y range, or change the network mask in your routing table to 255.255.0.0

If the IPs are given by a DHCP server, you should reconfigure it.

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Hmm i'm having difficulties understanding why it does not work out of the box for you. are we getting the entire story?

If your printer has an IP on the wireless network. It should have a 192.168.x ip. meaning if i look on your routing table that the traffic to it will be properly routed to the wireless network.

How did you install the printer on your computer? Do you use a print server of some kind, like a windows / cups print server runing on another IP than the printer itself? Or do you use IP printing , so to print directly to the printer?

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Yes, the printer has the IP 192.168.1.11. I installed the printer by using System -> Printing -> New Printer under XFCE4. The printer was detected over the wireless and was setup easily. Then I connected the LAN cable to my computer. I should mention that the printer wasn't detected while the LAN cable was connected. I had to unplug the LAN to get the printer to show up in the "Add Printer" screen. –  pravin May 4 '12 at 7:54
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