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Yesterday I upgraded my Ubuntu by SSH but before I finished it, I restarted my computer. I know that was not very smart. Anyway now I don't have internet connection, the WiFi or Ethernet is not recognized.

When I try on the latest version installed, the mice didn't work. When I try with previous version and go in gnome-network manager it's said:

The system network service is not compatible with this version

Another thing is when I comeback to the remote computer and look at the SSH terminal the process have stopped at:

Setting up desktop-file-utils (0.20-0ubuntu2) ... 
Configuration file `/etc/gnome/defaults.list' 
==> Modified (by you or by a script)
since installation. ==> Package distributor has shipped 
an updated version. What would you like to do about it ? 
Your options are: Y or I:install the package maintainer's 
version N or O : keep your currently-installed version D : 
show the differences between the versions Z : start a shell 
to examine the situation The default action is to keep your 
current version. * defaults.list (Y/I/N/O/D/Z) [default=N] ? 
Write failed: Broken pipe

Is there any simple solution other than I having to reinstall my system?

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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Go into settings, startup items. Add an entry with the following command:

gksu service network-manager start

You can also use visudo to add a NOPASSWD entry for this command so you do not need to give a password.

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It's not a very clean way... –  hexafraction Jun 27 '12 at 22:52
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Just stick the following in /etc/rc.local before the line that says "exit":

NetworkManager

That should launch it whenever your system starts. A better way would be to add it to the appropriate init scripts so that it doesn't start in single user mode, but honestly it won't hurt anything this way either.

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I faced the same issue. Workaround is to start the network-manager manually

sudo service network-manager start

Still trying to figure a way to fix it permanently.

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I haven't found one besides reinstalling :/ –  the_drow Nov 24 '13 at 12:27
    
Did you find the permanent way? –  J.A.F Feb 22 at 10:55
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So I do the bad solution: download the last version of ubuntu and re-instal the system. Be sure your data is on another disk when you do this.

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Reinstalls should only be recommended when necessary. –  hexafraction Jul 6 '12 at 11:54
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