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OK, ranting and raving won't get me anywhere. I installed 12.04 and all my previous stuff was there and worked. I was trying to tweak it and followed some bad advice and screwed it up. I then re-installed 11.10 and that installation created a new partition, I can still access all my stuff on the other partition but what I'd really like to do is for ubuntu to boot into the partition where all my stuff is and for everything to work like it used to. Is that possible?

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When you boot up, do you get a Grub screen (choice of boot options)? –  Kelley Apr 30 '12 at 23:22
    
Hello & thanks. Yes, but just comes back to the same version on the new partition. –  Steve Apr 30 '12 at 23:53

1 Answer 1

Ok, assuming your GRUB is working fine, and you are booting into the 'new' install on another partition somehow. Yet your old partition still exists.

You can edit your 'working' grub menu to point to the other boot kernels located at /dev/sdXX/boot/vmlinuz-X.X.X-XX-XXXXXX

Basically, like the following:

menuentry 'RescueMePlz' --class ubuntu --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os { recordfail gfxmode $linux_gfx_mode insmod gzio insmod part_msdos insmod ext2 set root='(hd0,msdos5)' search --no-floppy --fs-uuid --set=root 1d73dc63-beac-4c49-a8c7-f4efd6fe3cb7 linux /vmlinuz-3.2.0.24-generic root=/dev/mapper/somediskgroupvg-rootv ro quiet splash $vt_handoff initrd /initrd.img-3.2.0.24-generic }

where --set=root is your UUID or device path

you can run sudo blkid to find your previous /boot device's uuid value (or cheat by looking at your OLD grub.cfg)

important that you set the -set=root correctly

hope that gets you started.

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Hello & thanks for the info. Unfortunately I don't understand any of what you're saying. How do I edit the working grub menu? Thanks. –  Steve May 1 '12 at 0:00
    
Well... your working grub menu would probably be located at /boot/grub/grub.cfg -- you can sudo vi /boot/grub/grub.cfg then look at the file. If you're not comfortable with editing this file, I would be very careful doing so. –  papashou May 1 '12 at 0:05
    
OK, thanks, I'll let you know how it goes. Thanks again –  Steve May 1 '12 at 0:21

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