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I want to find a text file in my hard disk which contains a specific word. I want to use a graphic application.

I'm on 12.4 "Precise Pangolin".

Prior to Ubuntu 12.4 I used to start in the dash an application, I think it was called "Search for file...", whose icon was a magnifying glass. The first screenshot here: http://ubuntu.paslah.com/searching-files/

In Ubuntu 12.4 I can't find that simple application any more.

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2 Answers 2

Install gnome-search-tool.

sudo apt-get install gnome-search-tool

Open Search for files select Select More Options and


enter image description here

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do you have to restart the OS to get this to work? or maybe it doesn't work in 12? –  jcollum Apr 18 '13 at 20:55
    
have you done install part ? I am pretty sure it must work, it works on 13.04. –  geoh Apr 19 '13 at 11:29
    
which gnome-search-tool = /usr/bin/gnome-search-tool... but when I open the search option in gnome (Go, Search for files...) there's no option for "Select More Options" –  jcollum Apr 19 '13 at 17:25
    
open by typing in terminal: gnome-search-tool and I am sure you will see it. –  geoh Apr 20 '13 at 12:49
    
You can launch gnome-search-tool via the dash "Search for files", so you don't need the terminal. –  Bernard Decock Oct 22 '13 at 7:41

You can use the grep command from terminal:

 grep -r word *

This command will find all occurrences of "word" in all the files under the current directory (or subdrectories).

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7  
He specifically mentioned a gui method ;) –  Rinzwind Apr 29 '12 at 16:51
6  
The asterisk does not match hidden files. To search all files you can run grep -r word .. –  Ian Mackinnon Apr 29 '12 at 17:51

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