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Spent most of yesterday on upgrade from 10.04 to 12.04, on Acer Aspire One A110AB (Intel Atom processor 1.6GHz, 16gb ssd, 1gb RAM, no optical drive). Had about 2.3gb of free space to begin but cleared more on prompts during upgrade. Also got numerous illegible dialogue boxes of squares-for-letters, but 'OK'ed them, I think, on reading that they were an irrelevant Evolution artefact. For the last 12 hours the process has been frozen In stage 'Installing the Upgrades', with just 27min left, and the last progress item reading 'Installed mousetweeks'. The last few lines on the terminal read: Setting up modemmanager (ubuntu 0.5.2.0-0ubuntu2) ... Installing new version of config file /etc/dBus-1/system.d/org.freedesktop.ModemManager.conf ... initctl: Method "Get" with signature "ss" on interface "org.freedesktop.DBus.Properties" doesn't exist ...

initctl:dbus_error.c:69: Unhandled error from nih_dbus_error_raise: Method "Get" with signature "ss" on interface "org.freedesktop.DBus.Properties" doesn't exist

Aborted

At the moment the system appears to be more or less working -- I'm sending this through Chromium on it and I can look for files and edit documents in LibreOffice. 'Help and Support' doesn't open anything. My space is at 1.2gb. USB drives are not recognised. I'm not Linux-technical especially but can follow instruction on the terminal. Help, please? Thanks! Harry PS I note that the (well hidden) advice for the likes of me was to wait until July. However, given the hype about 12.04 and the widespread raves about its readiness and stability, I thought this was safe enough. I would rather not wipe my computer for a fresh install.

EDIT: I bit the bullet and restarted the netbook, and found I'm now the proud owner of a Unity desktop and an otherwise semi-functional system. Update manager says it can only do a 'Partial Upgrade' and when it tries it again finds itself blocked by another process.

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4 Answers 4

Was able to fix it up with this, thanks to advice elsewhere:

sudo fuser -vki /var/lib/dpkg/lock

sudo dpkg --configure -a

All systems go now. Thanks for the assistance.

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Sorry to hear about that, I'm no expert, but I can maybe give some advice.

If you go to the terminal and type:

gedit /etc/apt/sources.list

and look at the entries. This file tells Ubuntu what version to use for system packages (files). If almost all of them of them contain the name "precise", then you still have the updated repositories. Then you can run a sudo apt-get upgrade to make sure your currently installed packages are correctly installed.

To rerun the installation process, type

sudo update-manager and try to upgrade again.

Not sure if this helps you, but hopefully it will.

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Thanks very much @SveinT but while the sources.list throws up mostly 'precise', the other tasks appear to be blocked by the ongoing/stopped 'Distribution Upgrade' process... 'E: Unable to lock the administration directory... is another process using it?' –  Harry Apr 28 '12 at 11:53
Goto- /var/cache/apt

look for any "lock" file there

If found delete it.

If there is a "Update" folder clear it.

Next open "update manager" and try to Update.

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I don't have an answer, but I'm seeing the same error (in my case there are quite a few of the Method "Get" with signature "ss" on interface "org.freedesktop.DBus.Properties" doesn't exist errors in the /var/log/dist-upgrade/apt-term.log file)

My plan was to try to manually upgrade each package that failed with an apt-get install [package] after the upgrade finishes and before I reboot. Probably won't work, but worth a shot. Another option is a dpkg-reconfigure [package]

If you want to try it all at once: dpkg --configure -a

This might also give better output about what is locked and where. If I get this working (it's still installing) I'll come back and update.

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Good news and bad news. The good news is, yes, you CAN recover (mostly). The bad news is it'll take about 5 hours of effort and there are no guarantees you'll find everything wrong. Incidentally, in my case, "remastersys" is what killed me (specifically "casper" which remastersys installs). –  Jeremy Apr 28 '12 at 20:47

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