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I have recently been trying to setup a wireless access point on a small ubuntu server, but the wifi card doesn't seem to be compatible. Its a Dlink DWA-552, which I was hoping would work, but the chipset doesn't seem to support what I'm trying to do.

Is there another wireless card that's currently available that would work? This particular server only has a single PCI slot available, so that may be a limitation. I'd also prefer a card that supports 802.11 N (non-draft), but the important thing is that it works. If it works, I'd be happy with 802.11 N-draft or even 802.11 G.

Does anyone have any recommendations?

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3 Answers 3

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Indeed there are many adapters that work, however there may always be some compatibility issues when upgrading. My recommendation would be to install an external WLAN adapter that connects to the Ethernet LAN adapter thus being OS independent.

For me, the Buffalo WLI-TX4-AG300N Wireless-N Nfiniti™ Dual Band Ethernet Converter just does it's job and I can highly recommend this device even though it's priced slightly higher than an external or internal WLAN N card. In your case, when you run short of PCI slots you may find it very convenient.

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I've never used a WLAN adapter from Buffalo, but I have used Linksys' and Belkin's which I've been very disappointed in. I know they're cheap, but I'd still expect more than a couple years out of them. That's why I was considering building my own. --Or do you think its not worth the hassle? –  ks78 Nov 11 '10 at 15:03
    
Cant't really say in terms of "years" for Buffalo. Here it's running without a single reset for 24h/day since almost 2 years now. Major drawback is maybe that it only provides 10/100 Ethernet. I needed the 5GHz band and was unable to find out which internal or USB adapters really provides this in Ubuntu. Most likely there are some but they may not be much cheaper than the Buffalo ;-) –  Takkat Nov 15 '10 at 12:28
    
I decided against trying to build my own access point and just bought another cheap off the shelf access point. Maybe I'll try again when it bites the dust. Thanks for your suggestion though. –  ks78 Jan 8 '11 at 8:07

When I made my wireless router I used a GIGABYTE GN-WP01GS. I used hostapd to set it up but found that WPA did not work reliably. Putting it in WEP mode works quite well though. Also, do not set it to master mode in your network interfaces file and instead just use hostapd to configure it. Finding 100% compatible wireless devices is such a crapshoot. Good luck!

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Can't ndiswrapper be used at all to solve this problem? I'm planning on getting 802.11n based system, and I also need to address this issue. I like the accepted solution (Buffalo converter), but I wonder why this isn't as easy as using ndiswrapper to leverage the windows drivers....

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