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Is it possible to have a dual boot of different Ubuntu versions? X K L M E U Since only 1 gig of space is recommended you should be able to have 8 possible version on a 16 gig flash drive. Cause I really hate the scroll scroll bars in the Unity version and want to see which system I Like best XFCE, KDE, Fluxbox custom(is what my friend uses), etc.

Currently I have made 3 boot up drives all one USB drive which means erasing and reinstalling every time. Cheers,,

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marked as duplicate by Gerhard Burger, Warren Hill, Eric Carvalho, Aditya, guntbert Oct 24 '13 at 18:37

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2 Answers 2

There's "MultiSystem – Create a MultiBoot USB from Linux" The main page is in French so look here: http://www.pendrivelinux.com/multiboot-create-a-multiboot-usb-from-linux/

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Yes, this seems interesting. But how does it work? What does it do? –  Jo-Erlend Schinstad May 5 '13 at 17:25

You could customize the live CD image before writing it to your flash drive: Use package uck , although this is based on your already having Ubuntu installed to run uck. Just get Ubuntu in live CD, install uck to the live session, use it to customize an image, save the image, and write it to flash drive under Windows(As the squashfs partition may be in use when the liveimage is running) Source:Experimentation and synaptic description of uck I believe uck is in universe.

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This is used to customize an image, right? That's not the question. The question was how to boot many different images from one memory stick. –  Jo-Erlend Schinstad May 5 '13 at 17:24
    
This was a while ago, I do acknowledge it is incorrect in this context, but I will leave it up for historical reference. –  hexafraction May 5 '13 at 17:42

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