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I just bought a new laptop with Windows 7 installed and I'm planning on installing Ubuntu 11.10 for a dual-boot.

Here's my rather basic problem :

I have a 750go hard drive, pretty much partitioned like this :

  • Recovery : 25go
  • C: (Windows 7) : 295go
  • D: (Data) : 380go

That is the factory configuration, the hard drive is still fairly empty (I removed all the bloatware and didn't install anything yet).

This is what I'd like to obtain :

  • Keep my recovery partition
  • A partition for Windows 7
  • A partition for Ubuntu
  • A "big" common partition for Windows and Ubuntu data, all the files I'm going to create.

How can I do that? Do I have to resize/create the partitions in Windows 7 before installing Ubuntu? Do I have to do it while installing Ubuntu using Gparted?

I'm quite confused and I'd like to make it right so I guess I need your help.

Thanks a lot everyone.

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2 Answers 2

The Ubuntu installer will give you the option to resize your partitions, there will be a optionto install it next to windows, use up the whole disk, and 1 that says 'something else' in which you can manually set all the partitions you'd like, like that common data one.

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How I would go about doing this is:

1) Back-Up your system - seems obvious but it should be mentioned

2) Shrink your C or D drive. - This can be done in Windows quite easily, you can use GpartEd if you really want to but it is not necessary. There are thousands of guides how to do this with either option so I'm not going to go into too much detail.

3)Format the Data partition to FAT32 or get NTFS support for Ubuntu - Formatting the shared drive to FAT32 will be the easier option as it is supported off the bat by both distros, but I believe it gives you a file size limit of about 4gb. If you choose to go the NTFS route, there are plenty of guides available to guide you through that process.

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