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System Settings can be run from the launcher (pinned by default), the Dash, or the power cog. But what command would I enter in a terminal window if I want to run it from there?

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1  
open /Applications/System\ Preferences.app/ –  user157585 May 10 '13 at 22:53
5  
^ That's for Apple's OS X - just fyi... –  ParrotMac Jul 17 '13 at 5:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 65 down vote accepted

For versions before 14.04

gnome-control-center

14.04 and greater

unity-control-center
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Will not be found in Ubuntu 14.04. See answer below. –  Seanny123 Jun 23 at 19:05
    
@Seanny123 Edited. –  Vibhav Pant Jun 24 at 2:50

if you run

gnome-control-center

and get

gnome-control-center: command not found

you can install with

sudo apt-get install gnome-control-center
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14.04 and greater may use the command unity-control-center instead, which was forked from it. There's no need to install gnome-control-center as well. –  Christopher Kyle Horton Jul 2 at 16:18
    
@WarriorIng64 cool, thanks. This was meant to help those following the accepted post that had trouble with gnome-control-center (as I did). Not sure why this post received a down vote. –  grant Jul 7 at 16:55

In Crouton, you must run anything that would require a password from the terminal, such as update manager, software center, synaptic, etc. So, to get to system settings you would enter in the terminal:

sudo gnome-control-center

That will bring up the system settings GUI.

To check for updates, or if the update manager appears in the Unity Launcher, run it from the terminal, not by clicking on it:

sudo update-manager

The same applies to synaptic, the software center, etc. Anything which requires a password, must be run from the terminal in Crouton with a sudo.

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1  
AFAIK GNOME Control Center does not need sudo permissions to run. Also, using sudo to run GUI apps is potentially a bad idea. –  Christopher Kyle Horton May 19 at 23:34

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