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I'm at a complete loss, having searched all over the place and tried to get help on IRC. I booted the installer from a usb drive, and began installation.

When I detect disks, it asks me if I want to enable the detected RAID array. I choose yes, because I have a RAID0 set up in my motherboard's bios raid driver (which currently holds my windows7 installation and my (now broken) mbr). When I choose partition disks, it can see all partitions including those of Win7. I choose the free space and create a new partition automatically, everything in one partition.

When I move on to install the system, normal or live, it tells me "Installation step failed" without so much as a description or error. When I choose to install GRUB, it asks me to first complete "install base system" or "install system". When I choose base system, it seems to copy or download files and then it fails while installing grub again. On that particular step, I get asked where I want to install the bootloader. /dev/mapper is the default input, but neither that or /dev/sda or sdb etc works.

Any help is much appreciated, I'm clueless

EDIT: I finished installation without bootloader, rebooted and got into grub rescue. Then I used https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Grub2#Command_Line_and_Rescue_Mode instructions, and upon running "boot" it send me to a prompt mentioning "BusyBox". Prompt is (initramfs)

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I remember /boot can not use raid0 , but can use raid1. You use raid0 from bios. I donot know how to do it at that condition.

In general, I set /boot in raid1 or ordinary partition, and others in raid0, bootloader installed on /boot.(This is for softraid. )

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