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This is a similar question as this one: Limit internet bandwidth but in this case I am looking for a GUI app.

The other question was 2+ years ago so a GUI might be available that I could use to not only monitor but also change the maximum speed at which clients can download. A WebApp or a GUI app will help. It needs to work on 12.04 or newer.

Just to give an idea, I am looking for something similar to NetLimiter that gives me the control to know:

  • How much Download/Upload speed an IP/Mac has (Assuming this is a LAN)
  • Limit the Download/Upload speed for an IP/Mac.
  • Option to say at what time a speed can be limited or not.
  • Can cap when a certain amount has been downloaded/uploaded (Like 250MB per day)
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1  
vote for Idea #19624: (Network) Traffic limiter and shaper GUI if you want this :) –  Janus Troelsen Jun 30 '13 at 18:00
    
I'm not sure I understand the context : are you on a gateway, monitoring and limiting bandwidth to/from the computers behind that gateway, or on a single computer monitoring/limiting bandwidth to/from applications ? –  Rémi Jul 4 '13 at 7:36
    
Why is there no app-request tag? –  hbdgaf Jul 5 '13 at 1:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Network Traffic Monitor

(Only some of those needs could be satisfied with)

Can install it from downloading .deb file from Sourceforge

Can limit Traffic for data volume as well as time.

enter image description here

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It may be a bit heavy handed in the long run, but you could try Zentyal (formerly eBox).

I have a Zentyal box running and the traffic shaping works great. But, its a standalone box with 2 NIC's and it is my router. I did the Zentyal installer that just paves your machine and makes it a Zentyal box.

I am not sure exactly what you are looking for as your above question is not completely clear, but the mention of NetLimiter leads me to believe you'd like to install this on a workstation as a service that limits traffic just on that box. If that is the case, paving isn't what you are looking for probably.

Now, I did run Zentyal as a virtual machine in VMWare Player before implementing my production router box. I wanted to make sure I was familiar enough not to hose my internet connection for an extended period of time so I used the VM to practice. It took some finagling to push my workstation's internet connection across two virtual NIC's in a virtual machine on the same box, but once I got it working it did do what you are asking. It was fast, stable, and ran for a couple of weeks in the background and I hardly noticed it. I only gave it one processor and 1GB of ram and it was plenty fast, etc. Again, probably a pretty complex and overwrought solution to what you are really looking for.

I have seen reports of Zentyal modules getting installed piecemeal on an existing box and running in the background and doing what you need. I am not familiar with that method so you'd need to google a bit to get details.

But can I persuade you to upgrade your intent? Would you consider popping a couple of good gigabit nic's in an old pc laying around and firing up Zentyal, pfSense, Untangle, or any other of the many open source, free, full featured firewall's/UTM's floating around? It will give you QoS/Traffic shaping for your entire network and it's a good learning experience. Doing it this way I can watch the usage of my entire network by protocol, watch for unusual activity, drop the ping in most of my games way down, and make sure that when my wife downloads a movie on demand that my xBox doesn't lag so bad I get shot 3 times before a new frame loads.

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Is that available in Ubuntu? It has to be available for Ubuntu for me to accept the answer and also not abandoned as some other answers have shown (Nothing that does not work on 13.04 for example) –  Luis Alvarado Jul 10 '13 at 0:33
    
Zentyal is a unified set of integrated modules written specifically to run on top of Ubuntu. Their installer is the Ubuntu installer extended with their modules. Zentyal 2.3 was available in the Universe repositories for 12.04. 3.0 is the current version, and 3.2 is slated for release in September. So there is ongoing development. But... Zentyal's stated focus is a Linux Small Business server. As such they limit their official support to the LTS releases. Which means until there is an LTS release for 13.04 you may be better off staying on 12.04, or you may have to. –  Sonic Beard Jul 10 '13 at 0:56
    
P.S. Also, Zentyal is a commercial product now that maintains the original core portions of eBox for free. Just with community support only. The new features they have added to some of the modules are only available if you pay. The best thing to do is check out their website and see what you think. I have been more than pleased with their free version and it is better than any router I have ever used. Hardware, software, commercial grade, or otherwise. zentyal.org/server –  Sonic Beard Jul 10 '13 at 0:59

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