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As a loyal Ubuntu user I'm going to keep using the Ubuntu One service, even though I'm experiencing significant problems (I've posted about those separately). It would be really helpful, especially for diagnosing problems, if I could get some stats on cloud folders:

  • How many files are in a particular folder?
  • How much storage does a particular folder use?

When I have a folder like "Pictures" or "Music" that has hundreds to thousands of files in it, I can't just do a file by file visual inspection to make sure all my files are there. Getting some by-folder stats would be a huge help.

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2 Answers 2

Currently this is not possible as we do not store this kind of data in the system.

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You will need the terminal for this operation. For example you need to count the number of files in the Pictures Directory of your Ubuntu One folder. 1. Open Terminal 2. execute :

cd Ubuntu\ One/

(PS : Copy this command exactly, it may look a bit weird though)

followed by

cd Pictures 
  1. execute :

echo $(($(ls -l | grep -v ^d | wc -l)-1))

  1. This should tell you the number of files in a directory

OR if you want to know the number of Files and folder in a folder, follow Step 1 and 2 and then execute :

ls | wc -l
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OK, this works within the "Ubuntu One" folder, but how to obtain these stats for a folder outside, for instance "~Documents"? –  Vosaxalo Mar 7 '12 at 18:36
    
You misunderstand my question. I'm well acquainted with bash commands that can tell me about local files and directories. I'm specifically asking about the cloud folders, not local. I'd like, for example, when a cloud folder is listed by the Ubuntu One Control Panel as being in sync, to verify, based on number of files and data stored, that the claim of being in sync is legit. Right now I'm pretty sure its not. –  Mark Stone Mar 9 '12 at 5:14
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