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Gtk warning when opening Gedit in terminal

I have Ubuntu 11.10 installed on two different machines, both using x64 installs. Only one machine returns these Gtk warnings after using sudo gedit. I get these warnings when opening or saving a file.

Here is an example:

(gedit:2456): Gtk-WARNING **; Attempting to store changes into '/root/.local/share/recently-used.xbel', but failed: Failed to create file '/root/.local/share/recently-used.xbel.KBGV9V': No such file or directory

I also get another set of warnings related to "Attempting to set permissions of" the above mention directory.

Is this something I should be concerned with? Any way to get rid of those warnings? Like I said, my other machine doesn't return these warnings in the terminal.

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marked as duplicate by Uri Herrera, Bruno Pereira Feb 16 '12 at 19:13

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As far as the warning go.....they are just that.

If you are using gedit as a superuser then I would recommend using gksudo instead

CLI=sudo

GUI=gksudo

The reason for root permissions. See the tutorial

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Why would this happen on one machine and not the other? Same installs on both machines, with nothing installed extra. –  Muhnamana Feb 16 '12 at 3:07

To get rid of the warning if it hasn't gone away yet you can create the directory(s) that are missing, as in

sudo mkdir -p /root/.local/share

Or the 1st time you delete anything as sudo it will also be created if you send to the root trash

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Still fairly new to the site but how did you highlight the command in your response? –  Muhnamana Feb 16 '12 at 3:16
    
@Edubbs If you click the edit link under a post, you can see the source. In this particular case, code blocks have each line indented by 4 spaces and are set apart from other paragraphs by a blank line. –  WarriorIng64 Feb 16 '12 at 3:26

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